Kent Ridge Alumni Family Day on 17 August 2019

CALLING ALL STUDENTS, STAFF AND ALUMNI!

Kent Ridge Alumni Family Day (KRAFD) on Saturday, 17 August!

Themed Fiesta On the Green, NUS’ biggest homecoming will commemorate Singapore’s Bicentennial, while welcoming home alumni, students, faculty, staff and their families back to the Kent Ridge Campus.

Come be dazzled by the star-studded line-up of celebrity alumni performers including Joanna Dong (Arts & Social Sciences ’04) who came in third in Sing! China 2017.  Other exciting activities include a showcase of autonomous and virtual technologies, hands-on stations at Student Life Fair, and networking at the Faculty booths.  The festivities will culminate in the largest outdoor movie screening on campus of the popular animated film, Smallfoot.

Date:        Saturday, 17 August 2019
Time: 5.00pm – 9.30pm
Venue: NUS University Town
Note: Please note that photography and videography will be carried out throughout the event. The NUS Office of Alumni Relations may use some or all of these images in its print publications, digital platforms and/or marketing channels.  

Professor Ted Hopf’s work wins the 2018 Albie award

Congratulations to Prof Ted Hopf from the Department of Political Science on winning the Albie award from the Washington Post for his journal article, jointly written with Bentley B. Allan and Srdjan Vucetic, entitled “The Distribution of Identity and the Future of International Order: China’s Hegemonic Prospects.”

The Albie award recognises the best work on political economy in 2018. Named after the late, great political economist Albert O. Hirschman, the winning works are curated by Daniel W. Drezner, a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and a regular contributor at The Washington Post. According to Prof Drezner, “The important thing about an Albie-winning piece of work is that it forces the reader to think about the past, present or future politics of the global economy in a way that can’t be un-thought.”

Here’s what Prof Drezner said about the article:

“There has been so much written about the liberal international order this past year. Its critics are piling on, and even its most enthusiastic cheerleaders have doubts. This article, however, suggests that the current hegemonic order is likely to be far more resilient than the pessimists believe. This is because the core ideas animating the current order — democracy and free markets — have far more popular support across the globe than elites tend to assume. Any Chinese effort to challenge or supplant the current order is therefore unlikely to gain many adherents.”

On winning the award, Prof Hopf said, “It is always most gratifying when one’s academic work becomes part of the broader policy debate, especially when it concerns an issue of such contemporary significance as the rise of China.”

Click here to see the other Albie award winners.

Poorer families use more water to keep cool: Study (21 Dec, Home, Page B2)

The Straits Times

It was reported that a study conducted by Associate Professor Alberto Salvo from the Department of Economics at NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences has found that lower-income households tend to use more water when the weather is hot, while higher-income households consume more electricity. The study tracked the water and electricity bills of about 130,000 households living in apartments from September 2012 to December 2015. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications on 20 December 2018, can contribute towards improving demand forecasting for water and electricity in water-stressed cities in tropical Asia, where incomes are rising. It can also facilitate better design and allocation of water and electricity grids.

Read the article here.

Mangroves can help countries mitigate their carbon emissions, study

This was a report on a study by researchers from the Department of Geography at NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences which found that coastal vegetation such as mangroves, seagrasses and salt marshes may be the most effective habitats to mitigate carbon emissions. The results indicate that nations with large coastlines could expand these ecosystems to further counteract their fossil fuel emissions. These findings were published in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters on 24 October 2018.

University students studying regional languages up 10% from 5 years ago

According to Lianhe Zaobao on 9 October 2018, MOE reported that university students taking courses in ASEAN languages have gone up 10% compared to five years ago. Around 1,730 students at NUS, NTU and SMU took these courses last year, compared to around 1,550 in 2013. The languages include Bahasa Indonesia, Malay, Thai and Vietnamese.

Assoc Prof Titima Suthiwan, director of the NUS Centre for Language Studies, said the centre offers classes in those ASEAN languages. An average of 1,350 students take these classes each year. Courses in Bahasa Indonesia, Malay, and Thai languages have been popular with students in the past 10 years.

Tang Renxuan, a fourth-year student at NUS, became interested in learning ASEAN languages when she was doing voluntary work around the region in junior college. She is currently taking Southeast Asian Studies in NUS and is learning Thai , after completing a course in Bahasa Indonesia.

A/P Chris McMorran’s new podcast – This little dot we call home

Associate Professor Chris McMorran from the Department of Japanese Studies, together with a team of students, recently produced a podcast series called “Home on the Dot” and the project was featured in NUS News.

The podcast consists of 10 episodes, each revolving around a particular aspect of Singapore related to the idea of home, such as public housing and hawker centres.

The podcast is available at the Home on the Dot blog or via iTunes by searching for “Home on the Dot”. Six episodes, each about 20 to 25 minutes in length, have been posted, with another four to be shared in the weeks to come.

 

WP chief addresses grads at NUS commencement (20 Jul, Home, Page B4)

This was a report on the NUS commencement ceremony organised on 19 July 2018 for NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) graduates. The ceremony featured Mr Pritam Singh – an FASS alumnus and Secretary-General of the Workers’ Party – as guest speaker. About 470 political science, psychology and global studies graduates were conferred their degrees at the ceremony.

Click here to read the article.

In conversation with Syed Farid Alatas (29 Jun)

The Daily Observer

This was an interview with Professor Syed Farid Alatas from the Department of Sociology at NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, who shared his views on the emergence and augmentation of alternative discourses of non-western thinkers in the process of universalising and internationalising the social science.

Click here to read the article.

Subject ranking places FASS top in Asia

NUS is the only Asian university to gain a position in Quacquarelli Symonds’ (QS) list of 10 best universities worldwide, with 11 subjects attaining a top-10 ranking in the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2018. The University is also ranked in the top 50 for 34 subjects out of the 48 disciplines analysed by QS. 11 of those subjects are housed in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (Environmental Sciences is co-hosted with Faculty of Science). Overall, FASS is ranked in the global top 20 in the broad subject areas in Arts & Humanities and Social Sciences & Management.

Broad Subject Areas:

Broad Subject Areas
Global Asia
Arts & Humanities 18 2
Social Sciences & Management 7 1

 

By Subject:

Subject Global Rank Asia Rank
Anthropology 21 1
Communications & Media Studies 14 2
Economics & Econometrics 20 1
English Language & Literature 15 1
Geography 10 1
History 24 2
Linguistics 21 4
Modern Languages 14 4
Philosophy 51-100 6
Politics & International Studies 12 1
Psychology 51-100 3
Sociology 17 1
Environmental Sciences 10 1