fass news

Crisis of legitimacy for Japanese democracy (Page 22)

Friday, 19 December 2014

Lianhe Zaobao

This was an article contribution by Mr Gao Yang, a PhD candidate from the Department of Japanese Studies at the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, in which he observed that the voting rate in the recent Japanese elections registered a new low of 52.66 per cent. While it seemed that the Liberal Democratic Party won a convincing victory, the low political participation rate suggested a crisis of legitimacy for Japanese democracy.

Extreme weather events: Is climate change to blame? (Opinion, Page A31)

Friday, 12 December 2014

The Straits Times

In today’s edition of the Straits Times, there was an article contribution by Assistant Professor Winston Chow from the Department of Geography at the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences on the increasing frequency of extreme or weird weather events in Singapore and elsewhere, and whether they were due to chance or climate change. He opined that although it is difficult to pin down an extreme weather event as being caused by climate change, recent studies have revealed that an increasing number of global extreme weather events did have a discernible climate change signal.

Click here to read full article.

Public talk and book launch: “Arts, Culture and the Making of Global Cities: Creating New Urban Landscapes in Asia”

Public Lecture by Professor Lily Kong on the occasion of the launch of her new book, Arts, Culture and the Making of Global Cities: Creating New Urban Landscapes in Asia

Organizers: The Singapore Research Nexus at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, NUS and the Centre for Liveable Cities

Date: Wednesday, 25 February, 2015

Time: 4:30-6pm, registration from 4-4:30pm

Venue: The Pod, L16, National Library, 100 Victoria Street #14-01, Singapore 188064

Speaker: Prof Lily Kong, Geography Dept, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, NUS

Chair: Prof Chua Beng Huat, Sociology Dept, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, NUS

Welcome Remarks by: Mr Khoo Teng Chye, Centre for Liveable Cities

Presentation abstract: While global cities have mostly been characterized as sites of intensive and extensive economic activity, the quest for global city status also increasingly rests on the creative production and consumption of culture and the arts. Arts, Culture and the Making of Global Cities examines the cultural ambitions and projects in five major cities in Asia: Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Singapore.  The book provides a thorough comparison of their urban imaging strategies and attempts to harness arts and culture, as well as more organically evolved arts activities and spaces, and analyses the relative successes and failures. Offering rich ethnographic detail drawn from extensive fieldwork, the authors challenge city strategies and existing urban theories about cultural and creative clusters and reveal the many complexities in the art of city-making. The talk will draw on select case studies examined in the book.

RSVP to: nexus@nus.edu.sg with your full name, title, email address, and affiliation.

Programme

4-4:30pm: Registration and refreshments

4:30-4:45: Welcome Remarks by Mr Khoo Teng Chye, Executive Director, Centre for Liveable Cities

4:35-5:30: Presentation by Prof Lily Kong, chaired by Prof Chua Beng Huat

5:30-6: Q and A

lilykongbookcover

Discussion of The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future

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A Crisis of Global Modernity

—A discussion of Prasenjit Duara’s “The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future”—

 

ARI and FASS are pleased to present a launch event for the latest book by Professor Prasenjit Duara, The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future.

The book, published by Cambridge University Press, will be available for purchase at the event at a special discounted price. It can also be ordered here.

If you would like to pre-order a copy of the book to pick up at the event, please contact fasbox42@nus.edu.sg.

About the book

In this major new study, Prasenjit Duara expands his influential theoretical framework to present circulatory, transnational histories as an alternative to nationalist history. Duara argues that the present day is defined by the intersection of three global changes: the rise of non-western powers, the crisis of environmental sustainability and the loss of authoritative sources of what he terms transcendence – the ideals, principles and ethics once found in religions or political ideologies. The physical salvation of the world is becoming – and must become – the transcendent goal of our times, but this goal must transcend national sovereignty if it is to succeed. Duara suggests that a viable foundation for sustainability might be found in the traditions of Asia, which offer different ways of understanding the relationship between the personal, ecological and universal. These traditions must be understood through the ways they have circulated and converged with contemporary developments. More information on The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future is available here.

Date and time: Friday, January 30th, from 3-5:30pm

Venue: Seminar Room AB on level 1 of AS7 (FASS, NUS Kent Ridge Campus).

Programme

3-3:30pm: Registration

3:30-3:55pm: Presentation by Prasenjit Duara, chaired by Kishore Mahbubani

3:45-4:45pm: Panel discussion by Daniel Goh, John Kelly, Kenneth Dean, and Ted Hopf, moderated by Kishore Mahbubani

4:45pm: Q and A session

5:15pm: Tea reception

Registration is required. Please register by emailing fasbox42@nus.edu.sg with your full name and email. We hope to see you there!

The annotated Malay Archipelago (Read, Page 24)

Sunday, 30 November 2014

The Sunday Times

This was a listing on a book published by NUS Press, titled The Annotated Malay Archipelago, which was authored by Alfred Russel Wallace and edited by Dr John van Wyhe from the Department of Biological Sciences at the NUS Faculty of Science and the Department of History at the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dr John van Wyhe has included more than 800 footnotes to clue the modern reader into Wallace’s classic travel account of the Malay Archipelago in the 19th century

Buddhist values brought to life, artistically (Home, Page B14)

Saturday, 29 November 2014

The Straits Times

This was a feature on Associate Professor Irving Johnson from the Department of Southeast Asian Studies at the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, who has taken upon himself to fill the walls of the Uttamayanmuni Temple in Chua Chu Kang with scenes from religious Buddhist texts. Assoc Prof Johnson, who started on the murals in 2012, estimated that it would take 30 years to transform the shrine’s 30 or so panels into a rich tapestry of paintings. It was mentioned that such a massive undertaking usually requires a team of 20 skilled Thai artists to complete over a decade.

Middle class in Singapore feeling more insecure (Home, Page B16)

Saturday, 29 November 2014

The Straits Times

This was a report on the “Middle Class in Singapore: Security or Anxiety?” workshop organised by the Social Lab at the Institute of Policy Studies and the Social Sciences and Policy Cluster at the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences on 28 November 2014. It was mentioned that academics at the workshop said that the sense of security typically associated with being middle-class has given way to anxiety among such Singaporeans, as technology and globalisation widen income gaps and take away jobs. The workshop covered issues such as how healthcare policies affect middle-income earners and their attitudes on income inequality.

Click here to read full article.

Better scores now needed for NUS arts faculty (Home, Page B1)

Tuesday, 25 November 2014

The Straits Times

In today’s edition of The Straits Times, there was an interview with Professor Brenda Yeoh, Dean of the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, on the rising quality of students applying to the faculty. It was noted that this year, A-level holders needed at least an A and two Bs to get into the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences  at NUS, despite the faculty taking in the largest number of students at the University – 1,700 in all. Top A-level students, who score at least 3As, made up 15 per cent of applications, up from 7 per cent in the 2000s.

Prof Brenda Yeoh attributed the higher demand to the wide range of courses on offer and students seeing the value in a broad education. With 17 departments, 20 major subjects, a host of minor programmes and a centre for language studies offering both Asian and European languages, the faculty offers the most comprehensive education in the humanities and social sciences in this part of the world.

In a related report titled “NUS launched award for alumni in social work” (Home, Page B2), it was mentioned that the Ann Wee NUS Social Work Alumni Award was launched by the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences to mark the faculty’s 85th anniversary. The Ann Wee NUS Social Work Alumni Award is named after Mrs Ann Wee, former head of the social work department, often described as the founding mother of social work in Singapore. Today, she remains at the department as an Associate Professorial Fellow. Prof Brenda Yeoh said the new award will be given to alumni who have a similar spirit of sustained commitment and contribution to the profession and to societal well-being.

Click here to read full article.

FASS Bookshare on Nov 25 2014: Photo Gallery

FASS Bookshare was held on 25 November with presentations by Rajesh Rai (South Asian Studies) on Indians in Singapore, 1819-1945: Diaspora in the Colonial Port City, Rahul Mukherji (South Asian Studies) on Political Economy of Reforms in India and Globalization and Deregulation: Ideas, Interests and Institutional Change in India, and Itty Abraham (Southeast Asian Studies) on How India Became Territorial: Foreign Policy, Diaspora, Geopolitics. Click here for a complete catalogue of books and stay tuned for the next edition of Bookshare.

 

FASS Anniversary Dinner: A Night of Asian Nostalgia

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FASS ended its year of celebration with a bang! The Faculty’s 85th Anniversary Dinner. centred on the theme of “Asian Nostalgia” was held at the NUS Society Kent Ridge Guild House on 22 November 2014. It was graced by Guest-of-Honour, NUS Board of Trustees Chairman, Mr Wong Ngit Liong, NUS President Professor Tan Chorh Chuan, NUS Provost Professor Tan Eng Chye, former deans of the Faculty and 300 alumni, faculty members, students and friends of the Faculty.

In her opening address, Professor Brenda Yeoh, Dean of FASS said, “This evening, we are in the mood for nostalgia, and I would like to take you along a short journey from the beginning to relive how it is that we have grown to become one of the largest Faculty on campus in terms of undergraduate numbers, with 17 Departments, 20 Major Subjects and 7,000 students…The Faculty certainly has cause for celebration, and indeed, all segments of the Faculty have celebrated our 85 years in their own way.”

Prof Yeoh brought the audience back to the founding of the Faculty as part of Raffles College in 1929 to the present day and our celebratory events for the year. She then followed up her address with a quiz for all the guests to see if they had been paying attention during her address!

We also launched two awards that night; the FASS Student Leadership Award (FSLA) and the Ann Wee NUS Social Work Alumni Award. Mr Wong Ngit Liong and Prof Tan Chorh Chuan led the launch for the FSLA which was set up in commemoration of the Faculty’s 85th anniversary to recognise the efforts of FASS student leaders beyond academic excellence by focusing on experiential learning and student life leadership within FASS and the wider community. We also held the Faculty’s first ‘silent auction’ of artworks contributed by faculty, alumni, student and friends that raised over $42,000 in support of the FSLA.

The Ann Wee NUS Social Work Alumni Award was launched by Prof Tan Eng Chye, Provost, NUS. He said, “This award is a reminder that while we strive for world class standards in research and innovation, ultimately the work we do impacts community and society. I hope that our alumni, not just those from Social Work, will be inspired by the selfless contributions from Mrs Wee and the social workers as symbolised in this award.” The idea of setting up the award and naming it after Mrs Ann Wee was mooted by several social work alumni and friends to reflect the memory and affection they have for her as the longest serving Head of the Department and to recognise the work of the many unsung heroes in the profession.

Starting with an energetic starting performance by the Jigri Yaar Bhangra, Singapore’s pioneer Bhangra Company, the guests were regaled throughout the evening with performances by the Faculty’s very own singers – Mithila, who is currently a postgraduate student in the Department of Economics, and Farisha, an undergraduate in the Faculty and winner of Singapore’s The Final One competition. Mithila sang a wonderful rendition of Adele’s Rolling in the Deep followed by the upbeat Mamma Mia. Farisha sang two songs, Soulman, and Hidup Ini Indah, a self-penned number from her album, “Aligned”.

Guests were also entertained by re:Percussions who performed the Chinese Drum Medley 2211, arranged specially for this performance. The medley is a collection of music played on Chinese percussion instruments that contain elements of traditional Chinese, Western, Indian and Malay percussion music at its core.

It certainly has been a busy year for our Faculty and we would like to thank everyone for their support for the past 85 years. We are also looking forward to the excitement the years ahead will bring!

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