Xu Xiaoyun

Xu Xiaoyun
 

 

Personal Particulars
Research Associate
4 Engineering Drive 4,

E5-B12, Singapore 117585

Phone: (65)86473470
Email: xy.xu@nus.edu.sg

 

Employment History

  • 01 Mar 2021–Present, Research Associate (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering), National University of Singapore
  • 23 Oct 2020‒28 Feb 2021, Research Associate (NERI), National University of Singapore
  • May 2014‒April 2017, Project Manager (Design Center), Shanghai Electric Wind Energy Co., Ltd.
  • Aug 2012–April 2014, Project Engineer (Design Center), Siemens Wind Power Turbines (Shanghai) Co., Ltd.
  • Jul 2010–Jul 2012, System Engineer (Technology Department), Shanghai Electric Wind Power Equipment Co., Ltd.

Education

  • M.Eng., (Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering), Hohai University, China, 2010
  • B.Eng., (Thermal Power Engineering), Hohai University, China, 2007

Research Interests

  • Physics-and-AI based modelling and optimization for multi-energy systems
  • Hydrodynamics and thermal engineering applied to the renewable energy sector
  • Aerodynamics engineering science applied to wind energy

Research Highlight

Aug 2021–present A*STAR SINGAPORE FOOD STORY R&D PROGRAMME INDUSTRY ALIGNMENT FUND-PREPOSITIONING (IAF-PP) ON THEME 2 – FUTURE FOODS: ALTERNATIVE PROTEINS (AME DOMAIN)

  • Design, fabrication, and commissioning of a 2-module photobioreactor system for the laboratory-scale micro-algae cultivation.
  • Designed the heat exchanger and cooling system inside the micro-algae photobioreactor for controlling the cultivation temperature of the outdoor demonstration-scale photobioreactors.
  • Completed the outdoor test by using a LDPE-bag based experimental setup.

Figure 1: Water temperature and ambient temperature as functions of the global solar irradiance in Singapore’s outdoor environment.

Nov 2021–present  A CIRCULAR ECONOMY APPROACH IN PHYTOREMEDIATION

  • Research on the biochar production from gasification of water hyacinth for a circular economy

 

Chu Peng

Chu Peng
 

 

Personal Particulars
PhD student
NUS Environmental Research Institute,
1 CREATE Way, CREATE Tower, Singapore, 138602
Office: #15-02
Email: P.Chu@u.nus.edu

 

Education

B.Eng., Thermal Energy and Power Engineering, Central South University, China, 2011-2015.

Research Interests

  • CCHP system
  • Absorption cooling system
  • Dehumidification

Journal Publications:

[1] Chu P, Wang H, Chen J, Sun H, Wang H, Dai Y. Experiment investigation on a LiBr-H2O concentration difference cold storage system driven by vapor compression heat pump. Solar Energy. 2021;214:294-309.

[2] Li X, Wei L, Lim CW, Chen J, Chu P, Lipiński W, et al. Experimental and numerical study on thermal performance of an indirectly irradiated solar reactor with a clapboard-type internally circulating fluidized bed. Applied Energy. 2022;305.

[3] Li X, Chen J, Hu Q, Chu P, Dai Y, Wang CH. Solar-driven gasification in an indirectly-irradiated thermochemical reactor with a clapboard-type internally-circulating fluidized bed. Energy Conversion and Management. 2021;248.

[4] Jia T, Dou P, Chu P, Dai Y. Proposal and performance analysis of a novel solar-assisted resorption-subcooled compression hybrid heat pump system for space heating in cold climate condition. Renewable Energy. 2020;150:1136-50.

[5] Jia T, Chu P, Dou P, Dai Y. Working domains of a novel solar-assisted GAX-based two-stage absorption-resorption heat pump with multiple internal heat recovery for space heating. Energy Conversion and Management. 2020;220.

Conference Publications/ Presentations:

  • Chu P, Jia T, Dai Y. A Novel Heat Storage System with Solar Ammonia-Water Resorption Heat Pump Cycle Based on Concentration Difference. 18th International Conference on Sustainable Energy Technologies, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 20-22 August 2018.

Video Presetation

Liu Qinwen

Liu Qinwen

Visiting PhD Student

Education

Ph.D., Southeast University, China; Monash University, Australia. (2019 – Present)

Research Interests

Combustion and conversion of solid fuels

Publications

  1. Q. Liu, W. Zhong, A. Yu, Oxy-fuel combustion behaviors in a fluidized bed: A combined experimental and numerical study. Powder Technology 349 (2019) 40-51.
  2. Q. Liu, Y. Shi, W. Zhong, A. Yu, Co-firing of coal and biomass in oxy-fuel fluidized bed for CO2 capture: A review of recent advances. Chinese Journal of Chemical Engineering 27 (2019) 2261-2272.
  3. Q. Liu, W. Zhong, J. Gu, A. Yu, Three-dimensional simulation of the co-firing of coal and biomass in an oxy-fuel fluidized bed. Powder Technology 373 (2020) 522-534.
  4. Q. Liu, W. Zhong, H. Yu, R. Tang, A. Yu, Experimental studies on the emission of gaseous pollutants in an oxy-fuel-fluidized bed with the cofiring of coal and biomass waste fuels. Energy Fuels 34 (2020) 7373–7387.
  5. Q. Liu, W. Zhong, R. Tang, H. Yu, J. Gu, G. Zhou, et al., Experimental tests on co-firing coal and biomass waste fuels in a fluidised bed under oxy-fuel combustion. Fuel 286 (2021), 119312.
  6. Q. Liu, W. Zhong, A. Yu, C.H. Wang, Modelling the co-firing of coal and biomass in a 10 kWth oxy-fuel fluidized bed. Powder Technology 395 (2022) 43–59.
  7. Q. Liu, W. Zhong, A. Yu, C.H. Wang, Co-firing of coal and biomass under pressurized oxy-fuel combustion mode: Experimental test in a 10 kWth fluidized bed. Chemical Engineering Journal. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cej.2021.133457
  8. R. Tang, Q. Liu, W. Zhong, G. Lian, H. Yu, Experimental study of SO2 emission and sulfur conversion characteristics of pressurized oxy-fuel co-combustion of coal and biomass. Energy Fuels 34 (2020) 16693-16704.
  9. Y. Shi, Q. Liu, Y. Shao, W. Zhong, Energy and exergy analysis of oxy-fuel combustion based on circulating fluidized bed power plant firing coal, lignite and biomass. Fuel 269 (2020) 117424.
  10. J. Gu, Q. Liu, W. Zhong, A. Yu, Study on scale-up characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion in circulating fluidized bed boiler by 3D CFD simulation. Advanced Powder Technology 31 (2020) 2136-2151.

Dr. LI Lifeng

LI Lifeng  

Personal Particulars
Research Fellow
Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive, Singapore, 117585
Office: E5-01-01
Phone: (+65) 88896409
Professional Profile:  Google Scholar; ORCID
Email: lifengli@nus.edu.sg

Education and Work Experience

Research Officer, The Australian National University (ANU), Australia (2020–2021)

Ph.D., The Australian National University (ANU), Australia (2015–2020)

M.Sc., Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany & Uppsala University (UU), Sweden (2012–2015)

B.Eng., Zhejiang University (ZJU), China (2008–2012)

Research Interests

  • Optics, transport phenomena and chemical reaction engineering applied to solar thermal and thermochemical systems;
  • In particular, numerical and experimental studies of optics and solar receiver–reactors for high-temperature solar thermochemical processing;
  • Radiative transfer, transport phenomena and cell growth kinetics of photobioreactor systems for cultivation of microalgae.

Research Highlights

  • Ongoing project (2021.11–present) on Design, Modelling and Optimisation of Photobioreactor (PBR) Systems for Cultivation of Microalgae

Figure 1: Optimisation of photobioreactor (PBR) systems via a combined methodology of numerical modelling and experimental testing.

  • Research project (2020.11–2021.11) on Experimental Evaluation of a High-Temperature Solar Calcination–Carbonation Reactor Using Simulated High-Flux Solar Radiation

A packed-bed solar thermochemical reactor was experimentally tested for solar energy storage and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture using calcination–carbonation chemical-looping cycling of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). The reactor was driven by simulated high-flux solar irradiation provided by the ANU high-flux solar simulator (HFSS).

Optical studies were conducted for a high-flux solar simulator (HFSS) based experimental system and commercial-scale solar central receiver systems (CRSs). Optical studies of a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) and reflective optics were performed to aid in solving the limitations and problems of the HFSS-based experimental system. Commercial-scale solar CRSs were investigated for a wide range of receiver temperatures in a low and a high power level. A proposed novel solar beam-down system with a rotating tower reflector was proposed and optically investigated.

Publications

ARTICLES IN REFEREED JOURNALS:

  1. L. Li, J. Coventry, R. Bader, J. Pye, and W. Lipiński, 2016. Optics of solar central receiver systems: A review. Optics Express 24(14), A985–A1007, https://doi.org/10.1364/OE.24.00A985.
  2. W. Wang, B. Wang, L. Li, B. Laumert, and S. Torsten, 2016. The effect of the cooling nozzle arrangement to the thermal performance of a solar impinging receiver. Solar Energy 131, 222–234, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.solener.2016.02.052.
  3. L. Li, B. Wang, J. Pottas, and W. Lipiński, 2019. Design of a compound parabolic concentrator for a multi-source high-flux solar simulator. Solar Energy 183, 805–811, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.solener.2019.03.017.
  4. L. Li, B. Wang, R. Bader, J. Zapata, and W. Lipiński, 2019. Reflective optics for redirecting convergent radiative beams in concentrating solar applications. Solar Energy 191, 707–718, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.solener.2019.08.077.
  5. L. Li, S. Yang, B. Wang, J. Pye, and W. Lipiński, 2020. Optical analysis of a solar thermochemical system with a rotating tower reflector and a receiver–reactor array. Optics Express 28(13), 19429–19445, https://doi.org/10.1364/OE.389924.
  6. L. Li, B. Wang, J. Pye, and W. Lipiński, 2020. Temperature-based optical design, optimisation and economics of solar polar-field central receiver systems with an optional compound parabolic concentrator. Solar Energy 206, 1018–1032, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.solener.2020.05.088.
  7. B. Wang, L. Li, R. Bader, J. Pottas, V. Wheeler, P. Kreider, and W. Lipiński, 2020. Thermal model of a solar thermochemical reactor for metal oxide reduction. Journal of Solar Energy Engineering 142, 051002, https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4046229.
  8. L. Li, B. Wang, J. Pye, R. Bader, W. Wang, and W. Lipiński, 2020. Optical analysis of a multiaperture solar central receiver system for high-temperature concentrating solar applications. Optics Express 28(25), 37654–37668, https://doi.org/10.1364/OE.404867.
  9. W. Lipiński, E. Abbasi-Shavazi, J. Chen, J. Coventry, M. Hangi, S. Iyer, A. Kumar, L. Li, S. Li, J. Pye, J. F. Torres, B. Wang, Y. Wang, and V. Wheeler, 2020. Progress in heat transfer research for high-temperature solar thermal applications. Applied Thermal Engineering 184(C), 116137, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2020.116137.
  10. B. Wang, L. Li, F. Schäfer, J. Pottas, A. Kumar, V. M. Wheeler, and W. Lipiński, 2021. Thermal
    reduction of iron–manganese oxide particles in a high-temperature packed-bed solar thermochemical
    reactor. Chemical Engineering Journal 410(C), 128255, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cej.2020.128255.
  11. S. Yang, L. Li, B. Wang, S. Li, J. Wang, P. Lund, and W. Lipiński, 2021. Thermodynamic analysis of a conceptual fixed-bed solar thermochemical cavity receiver–reactor array for water splitting via ceria redox cycling. Frontiers in Energy Research 9, 253, https://doi.org/10.3389/fenrg.2021.565761.
  12. L. Li, J. Pottas, M. Habib, B. Wang, J. Coventry, C.-H. Wang, and W. Lipiński, 2021. Optical alignment and radiometry flux characterization of a multi-source high-flux solar simulator. Submitted to Solar Energy.

BOOKS AND BOOK CHAPTERS:

  1. L. Li, B. Wang, R. Bader, T. Cooper, and W. Lipiński, 2021, Concentrating collector systems for high-temperature solar thermal and thermochemical applications, in: W. Lipiński (Ed.), Advances in Chemical Engineering, Elsevier, volume 58, pp: 1–53, https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.ache.2021.10.001.
  2. X. Wang, F. Zhang, L. Li, H. Zhang, and S. Deng, 2021, Carbon dioxide capture, in: W. Lipiński (Ed.), Advances in Chemical Engineering, Elsevier, volume 58, pp: 297–348, https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.ache.2021.10.005.

ABSTRACTS AND EXTENDED ABSTRACTS IN CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS (SELECTED):

  1. L. Li, J. Pye, and W. Lipiński. Review of optical studies on central tower concentrators. In Proceedings of the OSA 2015 Light, Energy and the Environment Congress, Suzhou, China, 2–5 November 2015. Extended abstract.
  2. L. Li, R. Bader, and W. Lipiński. Beam-redirecting secondary optics for horizontal-axis high-flux solar simulators. In Proceedings of the 2016 Asia–Pacific Solar Research Conference, Canberra, 29 November–1 December 2016.
  3. L. Li, B. Wang, J. Pottas, and W. Lipiński. Application of a compound parabolic concentrator to a multi-source high-flux solar simulator. In Proceedings of the OSA 2018 Light, Energy and the Environment Congress, Sentosa Island, Singapore, 5–8 November 2018. Extended abstract.
  4. L. Li, B. Wang, R. Bader, W. Wang, J. Pye and W. Lipiński. Optical analysis of multi-aperture solar central receiver systems for high-temperature concentrating solar applications. In Proceedings of the 2020 SolarPACES International Symposium on Concentrating Solar Power and Chemical Energy, virtual, 29 September–2 October 2020.
  5. L. Li, B. Wang, J. Pye, and W. Lipiński. Concentrating collector systems for high-temperature solar thermal applications. In Proceedings of the OSA Advanced Photonics Congress, virtual, 26–30 July 2021. Extended abstract.

 

 

Wang Yiying

Wang Yiying
 

 

Personal Particulars
PhD student
NUS Environmental Research Institute,

1 CREATE Way, CREATE Tower,

Singapore, 138602

Office: #15-02
Phone: (65) 83113612
Email: e0679975@u.nus.edu

 

Education

M.Sc., Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 2021

B.S., Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University Malaysia, Selangor, 2016-2020.

Research Interests

Waste-to-Energy Conversion

Dr. Wang Bo

WANG Bo

Research Fellow

Office:

NUS Environmental Research Institute,

1 CREATE Way, #15-02 CREATE Tower,

Singapore, 138602

Phone: (65)91400062

Email: bo.wang@nus.edu.sg

ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8087-918X

 

Education Background

Ph.D. (under review), Solar Thermal Technology, The Australian National University, 2015–2021.

M.Sc., Erasmus Mundus Joint Program in Energy Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE), Netherlands & Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden, 2012–2015.

B.Eng., Energy and Environment System Engineering, Zhejiang University, China, 2008–2012.

Research Interests

High-temperature solar thermochemical technology

Energy storage and CO2 capture based on solar-driven chemical looping

Multiphase solar reactor design and modelling

 

Research Highlight

Design and optimization of a high-temperature packed-bed solar thermochemical reactor for solar energy storage

An indirectly irradiated solar thermochemical packed-bed reactor has been designed to achieve the endothermic reduction step of a two-step metal oxide-based chemical looping, which is a promising pathway for solar energy storage and water splitting. The novel reactive medium consists of binary Fe/Mn oxide particles was tested in the reactor under concentrated solar irradiation generated by a high-flux solar simulator. Leveraging commercial software and in-house developed programs, a numerical model was developed to simulate the chemically reactive and radiatively participative gas–solid flow for performance evaluation and operation optimization of the reactor. The solar-to-chemical efficiency reached 11.4% in the optimal case.

Schematic of the experiment set-up of a high-temperature packed-bed solar thermochemical reactor.

 

Publication list

  1. Wang, L. Li, F. Schaefer, J.J. Pottas, A. Kumar, V.M. Wheeler, W. Lipiński, Thermal reduction of iron–manganese oxide particles in a high-temperature packed-bed solar thermochemical reactor, Chemical Engineering Journal 412 (2021) 128255.
  2. Yang, L. Li, B. Wang, S. Li, J. Wang, P. Lund, W. Lipiński, Thermodynamic analysis of a novel solar thermochemical system with a rotating tower reflector and a fixed-bed receiver–reactor array, Frontiers in Energy Research 9 (2021) 253.
  3. Wang, L. Li, J.J. Pottas, R. Bader, P.B. Kreider, V.M. Wheeler, W. Lipiński, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering 142 (5) (2020).
  4. Li, B. Wang, J. Pye, R. Bader, W. Wang, W. Lipiński, Optical analysis of a multi-aperture solar central receiver system for high-temperature concentrating solar applications, Optics Express 28 (25) (2020) 37654-37668.
  5. Lipiński, E. Abbasi-Shavazi, J. Chen, J. Coventry, M. Hangi, S. Iyer, A. Kumar, L. Li, S. Li, J. Pye, J.F. Torres, B. Wang, Ye.Wang, V.M. Wheeler, Progress in heat transfer research for high-temperature solar thermal applications, Applied Thermal Engineering (2020) 116137.
  6. Li, B. Wang, J. Pye, W. Lipiński, Temperature-based optical design, optimization and economics of solar polar-field central receiver systems with an optional compound parabolic concentrator, Solar Energy 206 (2020) 1018-1032.
  7. Li, S. Yang, B. Wang, J. Pye, W. Lipiński, Optical analysis of a solar thermochemical system with a rotating tower reflector and a receiver–reactor array, Optics Express 28 (13) (2020) 19429-19445.
  8. Li, B. Wang, R. Bader, J. Zapata, W. Lipiński, Reflective optics for redirecting convergent radiative beams in concentrating solar applications, Solar Energy 191(2019) 707-718.
  9. Li, B. Wang, J. Pottas, W. Lipiński, Design of a compound parabolic concentrator for a multi-source high-flux solar simulator, Solar Energy 183 (2020) 805-811.
  10. Wang, B. Wang, L. Li, B. Laumert, T. Strand, The effect of the cooling nozzle arrangement to the thermal performance of a solar impinging receiver, Solar Energy 131, 222-234.

 

 

Dong Pengwei 

Personal Particulars

Research Assistant

Education

M. Eng., Chemical Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China, 2012.

B. Eng., Chemical Engineering and Technology, Qingdao University of Science & Technology, China, 2009.

Work expeiences

2012.7-2014.1, Research Assistant, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Group: Advanced Energy Technology

2014.2-2017, Research Assistant, NUS Environmental Research Institute, National University of Singapore. Topic: Energy and Environment Sustainability Solutions for Megacities (E2S2).

Research Interests

Thermal conversion of coal and biomass

Feng Fang

Feng Fang

Personal Particulars

Visiting Scholar

Education

Ph.D. , 2002-2006, Materials Science, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

M. Sc., 1997-2000, Polymer Chemistry and Physics, Soochow University, China

B. Eng., 1993-1997, Chemical Engineering, Soochow University, China

Work experiences

2000-Present: Associate Professor (2009-), Suzhou University of Science and Technology

2014-Present: Visiting Scholar, Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore

Research Interests

My research interests concentrate on: (i) design and synthesis of biodegradable microparticles/nanovehicles for therapeutic pathway in cancer; (ii) development of effective polymeric anti-cancer drugs and protein and peptide delivery systems; (iii) ecomaterials and reuse of solid waste.

During recent years, I has been the key member of one National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC 50878136) and five provincial research projects and participated in several municipal research projects. I am a PI of one Suzhou environmental research project, two research projects of Suzhou University of Science and Technology and two corporations’ cooperation projects.

Publication

P. Davoodi, F. Feng, Q. Xu, W.C. Yan, Y.W. Tong, M.P. Srinivasan, V. K. Sharma, C.H. Wang, “Coaxial Electrohydrodynamic Atomization: Microparticles for Drug Delivery Applications”, Jouirnal of Controlled Release, 205, 70-82 (2015).

Qiao Jian

Qiao Jian

Personal Particulars

Ph.D. Student

Education

B.Eng. (Chemical Engineering), Tsinghua University, China, 2008.

Research Interests

Supercritical anti-solvent (SAS) precipitation

SAS is a method of fabricating microparticles. In this process, a solution of drug, polymer and organic solvent enters a chamber filled with anti-solvent (in the experiment, CO2 is the most commonly used anti-solvent). The solution is sprayed and the liquid jet breaks up into small droplets. At the same time, the anti-solvent (CO2) diffuses into the droplets, leading to a sharp decrease in solubility of drug and polymer. As a result, precipitation of drug and polymer occurs in the form of particles.

Fig. 1: SAS equipment.

Supercritical anti-solvent precipitation with enhanced mass transfer (SAS-EM)

SAS-EM is an improvement to the existing SAS precipitati

on technique. CO2 is also used as an anti-solvent. In this process, the solution jet is deflected by a surface vibrating at an ultrasonic frequency that atomizes the jet into even smaller microdroplets. On top of that, the ultrasonic field generated by the vibrating surface inside the supercritical medium enhances mass transfer and prevents agglomeration due to increased mixing.

Fig. 2: Fabrication of cell culture scaffold by supercritical CO2 gas foaming method.

Particle-liquid Flow in a Taylor-Couette Device in the Presence of Mobile Porous Particle

Taylor vortices can be formed by subjecting a viscous liquid to a shear stress in an annular space between two rotating cylinders and a stationary bottom surface. In this study, the light porous particle was introduced into a Taylor-Couette device with an aspect ratio (G) of 6 and a radius ratio (?) of 0.67. The interaction of floating light particles and Taylor vortices inside a Taylor-Couette system was investigated using a high speed camera and a laser-based non-invasive technique known as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Moreover, FLUENT software was used to simulate the flow pattern of the fluid and analyze the particle motion. Our results show that the particle behavior in the Taylor-Couette device is strongly influenced by the Reynolds number, four types of particle behaviors were observed, which are the particle moved on a circular trajectory on the surface of the inner cylinder, an oval orbit, randomly motion between the circular trajectory and oval orbit, and trapped in the vortex center. In addition, the study of PIV shows that the trapped particle has local influence to the flow pattern and reduced the axial and radials velocity around the particle. The simulation from FLUENT helped to analyze the force exerted on the particle and expl

ain the particle behavior.

Fig. 3: Fabrication of cell culture scaffold by supercritical CO2 gas foaming method.

Study of Oxygen Transport in a Taylor-Couette Bioreactor

Taylor vortices can be formed by subjecting a viscous liquid to a shear stress within an annular space between two rotating cylinders and a stationary bottom surface. Taylor vortex flow is found in many practical applications such as reaction, filtration and extraction. In this study, Taylor vortex flow is applied in a bioreactor to culture cells that are seeded in degradable porous scaffolds. This choice is with reference to its advantages of low shear stress, high mass transfer rate and easy scaling-up characteristics. It is important to understand the transport phenomenon inside the bioreactor system for optimization on the performance. To avoid the shear stress caused by sparging, air bubbles are injected to form bubble rings inside the system. A high-speed camera is used to measure the bubble behavior, in conjunction with an oxygen sensor for in-situ measu

rements of the oxygen concentration in the flow field. The effect of flow pattern of bubbles on the oxygen consumption rate in the bioreactor is investigated for designing the optimal bubble size and bubble number for cell culture and tissue engineering applications.

Fig. 4. Typical trajectory of mobile particles at different Reynolds number regime; A: Trajectory at low Reynolds number regime, the particle the particle moved on the surface of inner cylinder; B: Trajectory at transition Reynolds number regime, the particle moved on the unstable orbit-moves along the circle and oval orbit alternately; C: Trajectory at moderate Reynolds number regime, the particle always sails along the oval orbit; D: Trajectory at high Reynolds number regime, the particle escapes from the oval orbit and moves to the center of vortex, thus its orbit evolves into a circle again.

Study of cell proliferation in porous scaffold in a TaylorCouette bioreactor

Taylor vortices can be formed by subjecting a viscous liquid to a shear stress in an annular space between two rotating cylinders and a stationary bottom surface. In recent years, Taylor vortex flow is found in many practical applications such as reaction, filtration and extraction. In this study, Taylor vortex flow is applied in a bioreactor to culture cells that are seeded in a degradable porous scaffold due to its advantages of low shear stress, high mass transfer rate and easy scaling up. The biodegradable porous scaffold is fabricated from solvent-free supercritical gas foaming technique. Cell seeding into the scaffold and proliferation inside the bioreactor is studied and compared with conventional bioreactor, and the optimal operation conditions are explored.

Journal Publications

J. Qiao, R, Deng, C.H. Wang, “Droplet Behavior in a Taylor Vortex”, International Journal of Multiphase Flow, 67, 132-139 (2014).

J.Qiao, C.M.J. Lew, A. Karthikeyan, C.H. Wang, ”Production of PEX protein from QM7 cells cultured in polymer scaffolds in a Taylor–Couette bioreactor”, Biochemical Engineering, 88, 179-187 (2014).

J. Qiao, R.S. Deng, C.H. Wang, “Particle Behavior in a Taylor Vortex”, International Journal of Multiphase Flow, in press (2015)

Conference Presentations

Eldin Wee Chuan Lim, Yu Xuan Tan, Jian Qiao, Chi-Hwa Wang, Particle Image Velocimetry Studies of a Taylor Vortex System with Immobilized Porous Scaffolds, APPCHE annual meeting, Taipei, 2010.

Jian Qiao, Eldin Wee Chuan Lim and Chi-Hwa Wang, Bubble Behavior and Oxygen Transport In a Taylor-Couette Bioreactor, AICHE annual meeting, Minneapolis, 2011.

Jian Qiao, Chi-Hwa Wang, Flow Characterization In a Taylor-Couette Bioreactor In the Presence of Mobile Scaffolds, AICHE annual meeting, Minneapolis, 2011.

Cui Yanna

Personal Particulars

Exchange Ph.D student

Education

Ph. D student. School of Material Science and Technology, Tongji University, No.4800, Caoan Road, Jiading District, Shanghai, China, 201804.

Research Interests

My research is mainly about magnetic PLGA hybrid nanoparticles for attaching target and moleculars in the biomedical application. Uniform and small particle size of these nanoparticles is an important factor for cellular uptake and tissue targeting. Another aspect of the research is to design and fabricate mechanized organic/inorganic hybrid mesoporous nanoparticles. The gatekeeper on the outlet of mesoporous silica nanoparticles can be cleaved under some certain stimulus conditions.

Journal Publications

Y. Cui, Q. Xu, P K.H. Chow,D. Wang, C.H. Wang, “Transferrin-conjugated magnetic silica PLGA nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin and paclitaxel for brain glioma treatment”, Biomaterial, 34, 8511-8520 (2013).

C. Lei, Y. Cui , L. Zheng, P.K.H. Chow, C.H. Wang, “Development of a gene/drug dual delivery system for brain tumor therapy: Potent inhibition via RNA interference and synergistic effects”, Biomaterial, 34(30), 7483-7494 (2013).

Cui Yanna, Wang Deping, Huang Wenhai, Yao Aihua, “Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of M?Fe2O4 (M=Fe, Ni) Hollow Nanospheres? Journal of Material Science and Technology(Chinese), 2011, 29 (4): 496-501.

Cui Yanna, Haiqing Dong, Xiaojun Cai, Deping Wang, Yongyong Li, “Mesoporous silica nanoparticles capped with disulfide-linked PEG gatekeepers for glutathione-mediated controlled release?(Submitted).