ReadNUS Issue 46

MAR 2022 | ISSUE 46
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Here’s Your Reading Summary

In February 2014, Russia first invaded Crimea and parts of the Donbas. More recently, on 24th of February 2022 and following the Russian military build up, Russia invaded Ukraine. President Putin blamed the enlargement of NATO, expressing fury over Ukraine’s attempt to join the European Union and NATO.

On the other side, despite being invaded by an overwhelmingly large country, Ukrainians continue to fight bravely for the sovereignty of their nation. Nations have condemned the invasions and have placed sanctions on Russia. Here are four titles to understand the historical roots of the conflict.

This Week’s Reads:
History and the Russian-Ukraine conflict

Clicking on the title or book image will link you to the full text.

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The protagonists in the book are the EU, the US, Russia and Ukraine and the chapters focus on each of them and on the key, cross-cutting aspects of the crisis, namely, sanctions, international law and energy.

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This book describes the strategies used by President Putin from 2000 onwards to recreate ‘Greater Russia’ by means of control, often through creating economic dependencies in the ‘near abroad’. Nygren discusses Russia’s relations to the former Soviet territories, including Ukraine, and Putin’s role in the ‘Orange Revolution’.

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This book discusses the successes and failures of the aftermath of 1995 and 1999 Western military interventions that led to the end of the most recent Balkan wars. It examines post-war European and American contributions to securing peace and building viable states.

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In Near Abroad, Toal examines the legacies of the Soviet Union collapse including unresolved territorial issues and the West’s desire to expand NATO which contributed to a growing geopolitical contest in Russia’s near abroad. It provides an understanding of geopolitics, often driven by emotions and ambitions instead of being a cold game of deliberation.
Literary Journal
We publish original articles written by our team that cover a range of topics from the trendiest authors to books, reading news and more! Simply put, Lirra’s Literary Journal is your go-to publication for all things reading.

Ancient Stories Retold

All About Love – A review by Nicole.

In this week’s article, Nicole Ng reviews All About Love, a book by bell hooks on her personal experiences and lessons on love. As recipients and givers of love, everyone can glean something from this book– why we shy away, feel jaded or lost in our pursuit of being loved and loving well.

What makes this book special is that hooks dispels misconceptions we have formed in our childhood or teenage years. She goes into the details of events that may have shaped our views today and shares her findings from the lectures she gives and activist work she does. To read more,  head over to our website now!

Ancient Stories Retold

Lovely War – A review by Megan.

Five deities, four mortals, and two epic love stories set in World War I. What more could one ask for in this season of love?

Falling in love amid tragedy certainly isn’t easy, as Megan uncovers in this week’s review of Lovely War by Julie Berry. It can be heart-wrenching, breathtaking and everything in between. But sometimes, love grows out of the darkest corners in the most unexpected times, and all one can do is to embrace it wholeheartedly.

To read more, head over to our website now!

Ancient Stories Retold

Professions – A review by Sean.

Amanda Chong is quickly becoming one of the most influential poets in contemporary Singapore. Her debut collection, Professions, is a bold body of work that invites the reader to bear witness to the experiences of a modern Singaporean woman as she attempts to make sense of her past relationships and potent moments of grief.

In this week’s book review, Sean Hoh shares what he loves about Professions and discusses its overarching themes of love, femininity and loss.

To read more, head over to our website now!

Ancient Stories Retold

Love, or Something Like Love – A review by Shannon.

In this week’s book review, Shannon Ling talks about O Thiam Chin’s Love, Or Something Like Love, tracing three short stories within the collection in particular.

Based on the title, the novel seems to guarantee tales of tenderness and affection. Yet, it seems only to leave readers with the realisation that we can never grasp the complex idea of ‘love,’ or even something like it.

To read more, head over to our website now!

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