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20 October 2014 marks the first day of the 7th International Open Access Week, an event commemorating the freedom of sharing scholarly research and facilitating knowledge creation from most copyright and licensing restrictions.

 

What is Open Access?

Open Access literature comprises scholarly material that is available online, free of charge, and allows mostly unrestricted usage.

 

open access

 

Routes of Open Access

There are two common ways of achieving Open Access — Gold Open Access or Green Open Access. NUS Libraries supports Green Open Access which involves depositing your works in repositories.

  • Such repositories could be institutionally-based, or they could be for specific disciplines. Some examples are SSRN for Social Science, arXiv for Math and Science, and PubMed for Health and Medicine.
  • There are also research-based social networks, e.g., ResearchGate and Academia.edu  that function like social media channels for scholars and researchers to share and discuss their works.

 

Why Open Access?

  • Open Access publications are a boon because we would not need to pay to read them.
  • If you are a scholar or researcher, open access provides a viable alternative to the traditional method of placing your works with publishers, and surrendering your copyright ownership to the publisher in the process.
  • Open Access articles assigned with creative common licenses allow you to control how others can use your works.

 

Open Access and ScholarBank@NUS

In conjunction with Open Access Week, NUS Libraries officially launched its Scholarly Communication Website which features information about Open Access and our institutional repository, ScholarBank@NUS.

ScholarBank@NUS houses the university’s scholarly output comprising journal articles, conference papers, patented works, as well as student theses. It provides open access to scholarly publications, and preserves the institution’s works for future generations.

 

As an NUS researcher, why else should you deposit your works at ScholarBank@NUS?

 1. ScholarBank@NUS increases your visibility through different channels, including FindMore@NUSL and Google Scholar.

  • Articles deposited in institutional repositories would appear in Google Scholar, as the repositories’ platform providers are constantly working with the latter to optimize indexing compatibility.
  • Therefore, by depositing your works in ScholarBank@NUS, you are also increasing the probability of your works being cited.

 

2. ScholarBank@NUS has a global outreach; between September 2013 and August 2014, the top 10 countries, such as China, India, the US, UK and the Netherlands, contributed to 870,214 (78.1%) of the 1,113,865 total page views.

 

3. ScholarBank@NUS is an institutional repository; therefore, it provides a stable and secured archive to host your works, thereby ensuring they are in permanent storage and easily retrieved.

 

As a supporter of Open Access, NUS Libraries is committed to partner and support you as the researcher in your scholarly communication endeavors. Join us in celebration of Open Access Week by submitting your works in ScholarBank@NUS!

Need more information on submitting your works in ScholarBank@NUS? Email us at scholarbank@nus.edu.sg

 

By Raven Sim and Chew Shu Wen

NUSL Scholarly Communication Promotion & Publishing Advisory

2nd Aug 2014 turned out to be a pretty unforgettable day for us in Hon Sui Sen Memorial Library.

We wished everyone could be there to share in this unique experience. We, the librarians at Hon Sui Sen Memorial Library (HSSML), had the opportunity to participate in an AMAZING RACE with over 600 new Business School students!

Here are some amazing pictures from that special day.

 

1(Picture 1: students thinking of a good strategy for the game)

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(Picture 2: students rushing to get their answers)

 

The Amazing Race was organized by HSSML and NUS Bizad Club to welcome new Business students. The rules were simple: every group of students received a few questions which they had to answer by searching in the library. The first group to have all the correct answers wins!

 

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(Picture 3: Intense search for answers in the Periodical Section)

 

After the group got all the correct answers, they then performed a cheer for Kah Wei (our librarian who acted as Assistant Station Master). The group could only proceed to the next station when Kah Wei was satisfied with the cheer! She would not let them leave nor would they get any bonus points if she was not satisfied with their cheers for her.

 

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(Picture 4: students thinking of a Hokkien song to sing to Kah Wei)

 

A big thank you to all the enthusiastic participants of the Amazing Race and also for bringing so much fun and joy to HSSML on that day!

We wish you all the best in your studies and hope to see you in the Library again soon!

 

 

 

Have you seen the current exhibition of beautiful photographs in the ArtsBuzz? If you’re wondering what it is about, below are some musings from 2 of the photographers themselves on this.

 

This exhibition shows what Japan’s heritage means to each of us who participated in JS3229: Field Studies in Japan. All the photographs feature various places around the Hiroshima and Kumamoto regions. Using these photographs, we aim to convey our own perception of Japan’s heritage, and also demonstrate how we can view a picture through various angles. By doing so, we continue to uncover the hidden history and heritage behind these landscapes which cannot be easily achieved through simply looking at landscapes and photographs at face value.

This trip was highly beneficial to me, no matter as a student or as a tourist. Being a tourist that had been highly interested in Japanese culture since I was young, I was able to see and understand Japan on a first-hand basis. I could truly understand why traditions and ideas such as furusato-zukuri (native place-making) were firmly rooted in Japanese culture. Being a student on this fieldtrip, I was able to view Japan through the tourist’s lens, and understand the mechanisms used in promoting domestic tourism within Japan in a more academic way. This module exposed me to the ways of Japan tourism, and is definitely the most memorable module and experience that I can take away in my university life.

~ Lu Qianni

 

This exhibition is about lessons we learnt from Kyushu – about heritage and how it is always prevalent precisely because of its importance to society. 

The 10-day trip to Hiroshima and Kumamoto was the most amazing study trip I’ve had the luck to participate in. Not just because of supportive and great classmates and the Professor, but also the friendly and hospitable locals that shared much about their lives and homes, inviting us to be a part of their communities. It wasn’t just a module, but a life experience where I learnt a lot about my own interests, how to look and not just see our surroundings, and about stepping out of comfort zones to talk to strangers. This exhibit provides our reflections on a particular photo that stood out for us in relation to our study of heritage and tourism in contemporary Japan.

~ Peh Chehui

The current exhibition will run in Central Library Artsbuzz until 25 August 2014.

 

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1. Your library pin is your smartcard pin

You probably know your NUSNET ID, since without it, you can’t access your NUS email as well as the all-important IVLE. But a surprising number of students don’t know their library PINs, which is the smartcard PIN issued during matriculation. The library PIN is needed for checking your loan record, renewing books and borrowing books using the self-service machines, among other things. You can retrieve it here.

 

2. RBR books can be borrowed overnight

Reserve Books/Readings (RBR) are highly sought after because they are recommended readings for various modules and can be borrowed only for 2 hours. However, few students know that they can borrow the an RBR book overnight just before the library closes and return it within one hour of the library’s opening the next day. For details look here.

 

3. Most books have a grace period

You probably know that the loan period for books is 14 days for undergraduates and 28 days for honours & graduate students. But did you know there is a grace period and that fines don’t start until the 4th day after the due date? Be careful to read the fine print (6. Rate of fines), as the grace period doesn’t apply to RBR books, 7-day loan books, bound journals and other materials.

 

4. You cannot renew an item if there is already a hold

Sure, you may know that you can renew books three times online, and you may even know how much extension a renewal gives. But what you may not know is that you cannot renew an item once there is a hold on it. That’s why it is a bad idea to bring books overseas for a long vacation as you cannot count on being able to renew the loan.

 

5. The proxy bookmarklet is your other friend

Google may be your friend, but what happens if it shows a journal article that requires you to pay? Instead of replicating your search in the catalogue, save time by using the proxy bookmarklet to access the article directly! Do note that the proxy bookmarklet only works on journals that the library subscribes to.

Using Google Scholar or PubMed instead? We have you covered as well. Also check out other useful search plugins that will allow you to access NUS Libraries resources seamlessly no matter where you are.

 

6. There are easier ways to cite and do referencing

We have quick guides to assist in referencing for various styles. But there are many ways to auto-enerate citations quickly. These range from using build-in functions in the library search engines, databases and Google Scholar, to using standalone citation builders you can find online. You can also consider learning how to use a full blown reference manager like EndNote (you can install this for free as a student or staff of NUS by following instructions in our EndNote guide), as these help you auto-insert citations into your Word documents.

 

 

7. Librarians have expertise and are here to help you

While librarians can’t do your homework, we can help you find books, papers and data sets relevant to your research and assignments. In addition, some of us are skilled in patent searching, use of reference managers, bibliometrics and may also have subject specific expertise. Contact your resource librarian today, or come for our orientations sessions to learn about using the library effectively for your assignments!

 

Tay Chee Hsien Aaron
Central Library

On 20 June 2014, the Science Library was honored with a visit from the Cambridge University Press team. They had specially invited Dr. Phil Meyler, the Publishing Development Director for Science, Technology, and Medicine at Cambridge University Press, for an enlightening talk at the Science Library’s Training Room.

 

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Titled “Academic Publishing in the Sciences and Engineering”, Dr. Meyler’s talk outlined the various stages of journal and book publishing. He provided various trends and insights into the modern publishing landscape and covered topics such as open access journals and some new and upcoming publishing models, e.g. the short book, open access book. During the talk, Dr. Meyler also dispensed several useful tips and practical advice on the preparation and submission of journal articles and book proposals.

 

sci 2

 

Most interestingly, Dr. Meyler explained how the publishing process in Cambridge University Press operates, from the submission of a paper or book proposal, through peer review, production, publication, and beyond. He also revealed how every single publication, book or journal article, in Cambridge University Press is scrutinized and reviewed by the 18 members of the Press Syndicate, also known as Press ‘Syndics’ – a governing body of curators who ensures that the content being published meets rigorous academic standards and upholds the prestigious reputation of Cambridge University.

 

sci 3

 

In the Q&A session after, Dr. Meyler received some thought provoking questions from the 33 participants, most of whom were graduate students. No worries if you have missed this talk, as we have Dr. Meyler’s presentation slides here.

If you are interested, you may also view or borrow the books mentioned by Dr. Meyler from the NUS Libraries. The links are provided below:

1)            Handbook for academic authors / Beth Luey

2)            How to write and illustrate a scientific paper / Bjorn Gustavii (Book)

How to write and illustrate a scientific paper / Bjorn Gustavii (Ebook)

3)            How to write and publish a scientific paper / Robert A. Day and Barbara Gastel

You may also wish to view our NUS Libraries’ collection on technical writing and academic writing to find more information.

~Science Library

Do You Know…?

 

…That the Hon Sui Sen Memorial Library (HSSML) has a seating capacity of more than 800? (Huat ah!) That makes us the third largest NUS library, after Central Library and Science Library.

 

…That HSSML has 12 discussion rooms open to all NUS students? They vary in size from small cozy rooms that seat about 4 people, to larger ones that can easily seat 12 to 15 people. (Big small bao ka liao!) Book them online via our Library Portal.

 

…That we have 8 study carrels for individual study purposes? (Again! Huat ah!) They are the row of small rooms on the second level. The carrels are open to all students, although priority of use goes to Business School students, especially graduate students. Borrow the carrel keys at the Loans Desk for 4 hours at a time.

 

…That we have a good collection of books on useful skills such as:

  • Managing personal finances
  • Resume/CV writing
  • Improving your IQ and EQ
  • Leading and managing people
  • Time management
  • Learning and studying skills

 

…That we not only have network computers, photocopiers and network printers, we also have colour printers that can print up to A3 size (great for poster sessions and presentations), and a scanner as well? Check out our Infocommons on the first level.

 

…That we have not 1 but 2 rooms for quiet study? The 3rd level Quiet Room is a “No-Click Zone” so students are advised not to use their laptops, mobile phones or other electronic devices there, ensuring a peaceful environment. Two sides of the room are floor-to-ceiling windows, so there is plenty of natural light. The 2nd level Quiet Room is tucked in a corner, away from the main reading area, and special carrel tables with high sides and front give students additional privacy. (Silence is golden.…)

 

…What this huge machine on the third floor does?

biz 1

 

 

This is an industrial sized dehumidifier. It keeps the air inside the library dry so that our books do not suffer from mildew and fungus. (Water may mean fortune in fengshui, but water in the library means we lose a fortune!)

 

…That we have a Hon Sui Sen Room? Mr Hon was one of our early Finance Ministers, and the library, auditorium, Conference Room on the third level, and even the small road between the Mochtar Riady Building and the Shaw Alumni House are all named in memory of him.

 

There you go, 8 facts you may not have known about Hon Sui Sen Memorial Library. While we primarily serve the students and staff of the Business School, we do have a plethora of resources that are useful to all NUS students and staff. Come visit us today!

 

– The Little Teapot

On 9 April, 2014, the Science Library welcomed several distinguished speakers from the American Chemical Society (ACS) to the NUS Campus and co-organized the event, “ACS on Campus” with ACS. Comprising a resume writing workshop and a series of talks tailored to scholarly publishing for all fields of science, the event brought together the scientific research community – undergraduates, graduates and research staff alike – to learn, share and benefit from one another.

Dr. David Harwell, the Assistant Director of Industry Member Programs (ACS), provided the 34 participants with insightful advice and tips on crafting effective resumes, while offering an overview of the landscape of industrial hiring trends. Close to 80% of the participants found the workshop very positive.

acs pic 1

 

 

Kicking off the series of talks on scholarly publishing was none other than Dr. Andrew Wee, the previous Dean of Faculty of Science, who is also the Associate Editor of ACS Nano. He was most enthusiastic in sharing with the audience his many valuable tips on getting started in writing a scholarly manuscript.

acs pic 2

 

 

Dr. Lyndon Emsley from Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon took the microphone next. The Associate Editor of Journal of the American Chemical Society impressed upon the audience the importance of peer review and its advantages and limitations. Together with Ms Norah Xiao’s talk on copyright and ethics in scholarly communication, the participants certainly gained much knowledge in navigating the world of scholarly publishing.

acs pic 3

 

 

The last speaker, Dr. Burtrand Lee, Program Manager of ACS Petroleum Research Fund, shed much light on writing competitive research grants and proposals. Many critical questions were asked of Dr. Lee, based on his experience as a fund program manager; similarly, several questions and issues were discussed during the other speakers’ Q&A.

acs pic 4

 

 

Tea breaks were also offered for the students, staff and speakers to interact and network professionally. The delicious food certainly was a boon to this beneficial event, as was the lucky draw held at the end of the day! One winner was drawn out of the 186 participants and he won a mall voucher.

acs pic 5

 

 

If you had missed this exciting slew of workshop and talks by ACS, do not worry! You can view the speakers’ content presentations at the following links:

1)          Introduction to ACS: http://libapps.nus.edu.sg/pdf/knowledge_creation/ACS/Introduction_to_ACS.pdf

2)          Basics in Scholarly Publishing: Getting Started: http://libapps.nus.edu.sg/pdf/knowledge_creation/ACS/Getting_Started.pdf

3)          Basics in Scholarly Publishing: Peer Review: http://libapps.nus.edu.sg/pdf/knowledge_creation/ACS/Peer_Review.pdf

4)          Copyright and Ethics in Scholarly Publishing: http://libapps.nus.edu.sg/pdf/knowledge_creation/ACS/Copyright_and_Ethics.pdf

5)          Writing Competitive Research Grant Proposals: http://libapps.nus.edu.sg/pdf/knowledge_creation/ACS/Research_Grant_Proposals.pdf

6)          Working in Industry: Preparing a Resume Workshop: http://libapps.nus.edu.sg/pdf/knowledge_creation/ACS/Working_in_Industry.pdf

 

Science Library

Law open house 2014

The C J Koh Law Library participated in the Law Open House held at the Bukit Timah Campus on 15th March 2014. To mark this special event, the Law Library’s opening hours were extended to 6 pm on that day. There were more than two hundred people visiting the Law Library that day as part of their campus tour.

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The Law library put up a display of books and journals in conjunction with the open house. It showcased major legal publications of Commonwealth Countries.

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There were also Law students who volunteered to give library tours to the visitors. These students did a good job in explaining our collections and facilities to the prospective students and their parents. The Law Library is proud to have hosted this event and looks forward to the next open house!

[As most of you should have figured out by now, this was NUS Libraries Social Media Team playing a small prank on April Fools. We hope this brought a small smile to your face:) Happy April everyone!]

Recently, NUS Libraries launched a  beta run of a revolutionary new service. “Sleeping Corners” were set up at various parts of the Central Library. It was part of a brand new initiative to give students space to rest and relax after a hard day of mugging. The “Sleeping Corners” proved popular, with many students giving their thumbs up of approval.

“I don’t stay on campus, so this is really convenient for me. Now I can recharge in between lectures!” said Tan Ai Khun, a 2nd year FASS student, as he stretched out for a nap beside the LINC terminals on Level 4.

 

Sleeping Corner combined

 

“I love the mattress and pillows. They are so comfortable, and they make the library look so homely,” said Siti Bte Tidur, a 1st year Engineering student, who decided to spend her lunch break resting in a “Sleeping Corner” at one of the chat points.

It is a common sight to see tired students laying their heads on the table for a short nap. While this simple act may help them to recharge, it could actually bring more harm than good. The position of laying your head sideways on the table may cause neck muscles strain and numbness in the arms. Some students may also inevitably drool on the table due to the awkward position and hence, creating an embarrassing situation when they wake up and also compromising the hygiene of the library facilities.

 

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NUS Libraries hopes to organize more such student-friendly initiatives in the future! Do leave your comments and let us know of any other initiatives NUS Libraries can be involved in!

 

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