Keynote: Dr Raka Shome To Speak at Goldsmith College London

Dr Raka Shome will be delivering a keynote talk- When Postcolonical Studies Meets Media Studies– at Goldsmiths College London, on 27 November 2017.  Her talk is sponsored by MECCSA‘s (Media, Communication and Cultural Studies Association of, UK) Race and Postcolonial Research Network, Centre for Feminist Research and Critical Race Studies, and Department of Communication, at Goldsmiths College.

Student Showcase: CNM Students Work With NUS Office of Student Affairs To Spread Care And Encouragement

With the semester peaking and exams coming ever closer, it’s normal to see students rushing from one class to another, intent looks on faces. Which is why the Office of Student AffairsStudent Support Services partnered students from the Communications and New Media department to develop a campaign heartwarmingly called Sail The Heartships Together. The campaign’s aim was to motivate students to stop, rest and encourage a special buddy during the hectic season. Set up along the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences’ Block AS1 walkway on 30 October 2017, the booth attracted more than 500 participants. Expressive words of thought and encouragement were penned down and exchanged between buddies who stopped by the booth together. Many had a refreshing chance to indulge in decant sweet ice cream before they made their way to the next class. It was, all in all, an unusual but fantastic intervention into the busy lives of NUS students.

WHO ARE THEY? The students who formulated and rolled out Sail the Heartships Together are part of the CNM module NM4219- New Media In Health Communication, which focuses on how new media can be used to build grassroots engagement, promote policy advocacy, and build environments that support healthy behavior change. Like most modules in Communications and New Media, students are encouraged to bridge theory and practice by working directly with stakeholders and communities.

View more images from the campaign here.

NUS CNM Faculty Andrew Quitmeyer At DC Art Science Evening Rendezvous

Assistant Professor Andrew Quitmeyer presented a talk at the DC Art Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER), in which he discussed how:

Digital interactive technology holds great potential for experimenting with and understanding wild animals. Traditional ways of designing tech, however, pull field biologists out of nature and into the lab. This talk discusses wearable and mobile laboratories that let artists, designers, and biologists create their own tools entirely in the wild.

Here’s the live stream of the event, including Andrew’s talk: DASER Live Stream

 

Student Showcase: Design Fiction 2017- An Uncertain Future Visualised and Explained Through Fiction

Ever wondered what the world will be like decades, or even centuries from now? One thing is for sure, the inexorable forces of climate change is going to have an impact on how we live, where we live, and most importantly, what we are going to live for. In a unique exhibition of prototypes that challenge our fondest ideas, CNM students from the Design Fiction module explore the Frontiers of Ecological Interaction, and take you on a journey rarely imagined.

Science fiction-type storyworlds are presented through the creation of interactive, futuristic objects that aim to provoke important discussions on our precarious future.

Learn how CNM students, under the tutelage of Assistant Professor Andrew Quitmeyer, begin to explore today’s technology, and the issues that arise between man’s actions and the natural world, through interactive objects, performances and believable storyworlds.

Come see the exhibition, and tell us what is your own vision of the future…


Date: Saturday, 18 November 2017
Time: 3:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Venue: Singapore Botanical Gardens, Eco-Garden

More details at: Singapore Botanical Gardens Programmes

CNM Research Talk: The Power Of Platforms- Presented By Professor Rasmus Kleis Nielsen

Abstract:

Platform companies like Facebook, Google, Twitter have clearly emerged as effective brokers in hard as well as soft power. But they also take advantage of more distinctive forms of platform power. Professor Rasmus Kleis Nielsen identifies 5 components of platform power:

  • standards
  • connections
  • automated action at scale
  • secrecy
  • fungibility

The enabling, transformative and productive nature of these platforms empower its users, even as they force them to become more dependent. He argues that platform power is neither sovereign nor arbitrary, but deeply relational. Ultimately, platform power is closely aligned to the provider’s strategic interests, and continues to drive a structural transformation of nothing less than the media environment.

Speaker: 

Rasmus Kleis Nielsen is Director of Research at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, Professor of Political Communication at the University of Oxford, and editor in chief of the International Journal of Press/Politics. Recent books include The Changing Business of Journalism and its Implications for Democracy (2010, edited with David A. L. Levy), Ground Wars: Personalized Communication in Political Campaigns (2012) (winner of the Doris Graber Award from the American Political Science Association, awarded for the best book in political communication published in the last ten years), and Political Journalism in Transition: Western Europe in a Comparative Perspective (2014, edited with Raymond Kuhn).

1 November 2017
4:15 PM – 5:15 PM

Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
National University of Singapore
Blk AS6, #03-33
CNM Meeting Room

Register cnmn.us/platformpower.

CNM Industry Leaders Summit 2017: Next Generation Thinking And Social Imact

Have you always wondered what communications will evolve into as digital spaces and digital literacy grow exponentially? Or how open communications can help maximise social impact? What about fake news, and how truth is being managed in today’s volatile climate? Join our panel of industry leaders and influencers to unravel the urgent challenges of future communications.

The Department of Communications and New Media is proud to host the Industry Leaders Summit, inviting distinguished speakers as:

19 October 2017
2:00 pm  – 6:00 pm

NUS University Hall Auditorium,
Lee Kong Chian Wing Level 2,
21 Lower Kent Ridge Road
Singapore 119077

Limited Seats Available.
Register Online Now at cnmn.us/leadersummit

CNM Research Talk: Top 10 Lessons In Media Studies- Presented By Professor Susan J Douglas

Abstract: In this talk, Professor Susan J Douglas aims to distill what she has learned in her career, not only as a practitioner of humanities-based media studies, but also as a media historian. She will focus on the problems we commonly have to confront with archives, the importance of placing media texts and trends within their historical contexts, how we need to let our sources lead us to our conclusions instead of approaching them with foregone conclusions, the importance of empathy, and the need to both engage with theory and yet resist the obfuscating pull of jargon in our field. Then, she will also provide a defense of textual analysis.

Speaker: Susan Douglas is the Catherine Neafie Kellogg Professor of Communication Studies at The University of Michigan and former Chair of the Department.  She is author of The Rise of Enlightened Sexism:  How Pop Culture Took Us From Girl Power to Girls Gone Wild (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2010); The Mommy Myth:  The Idealization of Motherhood and How it Undermines Women (with Meredith Michaels, The Free Press, 2004); Listening In:  Radio and the American Imagination (Times Books, 1999), which won the Hacker Prize in 2000 for the best popular book about technology and culture, Where The Girls Are:  Growing Up Female with the Mass Media (Times Books, 1994) and Inventing American Broadcasting, 1899-1922 (Johns Hopkins, 1987). Where the Girls Are was widely praised, and chosen one of the top ten books of 1994 by National Public Radio, Entertainment Weekly and The McLaughlin Group. She served on the Board of the George Foster Peabody awards from 2005-2010, and in 2010 was selected as Chair of the Board.  She is the 2009 recipient of the Leonardo Da Vinci Prize, the highest honor given by the Society for the History of Technology to an individual who has greatly contributed to the history of technology through research, teaching, publications, and other activities.

17 October 2017
4:15 PM – 5:15 PM

Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
National University of Singapore
Blk AS6, #03-33
CNM Meeting Room

Register here.

CNM Research Talk: The Media, Baby Boomers And The Advent Of Aspirational Aging- Presented By Professor Susan J Douglas

Abstract: Up to 76 million people in the U.S. are approaching retirement. Around the world, populations are aging. This talk explores the contradictory terrain of aging in American media, where negative stereotypes of older people are colliding with Aspirational Aging, a media-crafted zeitgeist whose central tenet is that aging is something we can and should ‘defy’. The defiance discourse is especially advanced by what Professor Susan J Douglas labels the Anti-Aging Industrial Complex. The talk will also note the intersections between ageism and sexism, and emphasise how neoliberal discourses about personal responsibility frame and mark off good, successful aging from bad, failed aging.

Speaker: Susan Douglas is the Catherine Neafie Kellogg Professor of Communication Studies at The University of Michigan and former Chair of the Department.  She is author of The Rise of Enlightened Sexism:  How Pop Culture Took Us From Girl Power to Girls Gone Wild (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2010); The Mommy Myth:  The Idealization of Motherhood and How it Undermines Women (with Meredith Michaels, The Free Press, 2004); Listening In:  Radio and the American Imagination (Times Books, 1999), which won the Hacker Prize in 2000 for the best popular book about technology and culture, Where The Girls Are:  Growing Up Female with the Mass Media (Times Books, 1994) and Inventing American Broadcasting, 1899-1922 (Johns Hopkins, 1987). Where the Girls Are was widely praised, and chosen one of the top ten books of 1994 by National Public Radio, Entertainment Weekly and The McLaughlin Group. She served on the Board of the George Foster Peabody awards from 2005-2010, and in 2010 was selected as Chair of the Board.  She is the 2009 recipient of the Leonardo Da Vinci Prize, the highest honor given by the Society for the History of Technology to an individual who has greatly contributed to the history of technology through research, teaching, publications, and other activities.

16 October 2017
4:15 PM – 5:15 PM

Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
National University of Singapore
Blk AS6, #03-38
CNM Playroom

Register here.

Platform Research, Logistical Infrastructures and Autonomous Media- Professor Ned Rossiter

In this talk, Professor Ned Rossiter will reflect on the practice of devising platforms for collective research projects, and chart some of the key conditions and critical debates that have defined the past decade in fields of media theory, activist politics and urban studies. He will address topics ranging from a critique of creative industries, experiments in urban mapping in Beijing, circuits of labour in cultural industries in Shanghai and the formation of IT towns in Kolkata, the making of logistical worlds in Athens, Chile and West Bengal, and the territoriality of data infrastructures. Common to all of these projects is a focus on contemporary labour regimes and the technics of governance.Professor Ned Rossiter’s talk will elaborate how he developed a media theory attentive to the operation of power and the variation of globality. He will conclude with a sketch of nascent research on the automation of society and the prospects for undertaking media theory in environments governed by digital objects.

Date: 13 Oct 2017
Time: 3.30 P.M
Venue: AS7-01-16/17/18 – FASS DEANS OFFICE SEMINAR ROOM B

Speaker:

Professor Ned Rossiter

Professor of Communication with a joint appointment in the Institute for Culture and Society and the School of Humanities and Communication Arts at Western Sydney University.