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Each of us are different from one another. Just like these differences in ourselves, we all have our own unique experiences with big events in life. Education is one of them. We all feel the pressures of education when we are students. At some point in the game, there is a moment – or multiple – that feel like they are swarming us too much. Whether that moment presents itself when looking at the GMAT test series before the big examinations, or when we are struggling under the mountain of assignments that are all due within five days – or less – of one another, we have all felt it.

For some students, it is an unfortunate reality that they feel the pressures more so than their peers do. Constantly, in some cases. It can feel like the weight of the world is squarely on your shoulders, and you have no way to escape it. The light at the end of the tunnel feels dimmer and dimmer, until it seemingly disappears altogether. It is the single greatest misconception that students who struggle do so because they have weak mindsets. This is not only incorrect, but it is incredibly damaging.

One of the biggest problems with the global education system right now is that it largely still operates on a broad curriculum, that functions on the ideal that every student is to complete the same assignment, at the same time, in the same way. This approach to teaching is unhealthy, because each student has different learning capabilities, and essentially forcing them to all conform to the one learning approach is not only unfair, but positively brutal. The pressure is overwhelming to a fault.

In fact, it is the reason why it is not difficult at all to understand how there is a growing epidemic in schools around the globe that centers around the mental health of the students that go to those schools. The mental health of anyone, in any circumstance, should be of the utmost importance, but it is perhaps never more intense than when it is a student that is struggling to find the light in what should be an exciting, progressive stage in their lives. All over the world, students are struggling. This is not a geographical issue. This is a globally collective issue that is fast becoming an epidemic.

The mental health crisis spanning the globe is catastrophic. There is no denying this fact. What is fundamentally more heartbreaking again is the fact that people under immense pressure – i.e. students, for example – are dealing with the pressures by collapsing in on themselves, due to lack of honest, open, and non-judgmental assistance. This is something that must be changed. The time for action was yesterday, it was last year…it was even last decade. But it is better late than never, and we are responsible for pioneering that action forward and ensuring its longevity now and into the future. We cannot afford to keep losing students. We just cannot.