CNM and ARI Research Talk: The Question of China and the West in World Philosophy- Presented By Steve Fuller

Abstract:

This talk will survey the changing relationship between the ‘West’ and ‘China’ as representative of certain cultural and philosophical ideals, especially the contemporary significance of that relationship, given the recent re-emergence of China as a global superpower. In this context I will pay special attention to the claims made in Bryan van Norden’s new book, Taking Back Philosophy: A Multicultural Manifesto, which appeals in part to Chinese philosophy as a foil for Western philosophy.

Speaker: 

Steve Fuller is Auguste Comte Professor of Social Epistemology in the Department of Sociology at the University of Warwick, UK. Originally trained in history and philosophy of science, Fuller is best known for his foundational work in the field of ‘social epistemology’, which is the name of a quarterly journal that he founded in 1987 as well as the first of his more than twenty books. From 2011 to 2014 he published a trilogy relating to the idea of a ‘post-‘ or ‘trans’ human future, all published with Palgrave Macmillan under the rubric of ‘Humanity 2.0’. His most recent books are Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History (Routledge 2015) and The Academic Caesar (Sage 2016). His works have been translated into over twenty languages. He was awarded a D.Litt. by the University of Warwick in 2007 for sustained lifelong contributions to scholarship. His latest book, Post-Truth: Knowledge as a Power Game, is published by Anthem Press in 2018.

24 April 2018
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Block AS8, #04-04
ARI Seminar Room

If you are an NUS Staff or Student, register online at: https://cnmn.us/taSr6

 

CNM Research Talk: Queer will: Hikikomori as willful subjects- Presented By Dr Rosemary Overell

Abstract:

This presentation considers hikikomori as willful subjects. The hikikomori are a portion of the Japanese population who withdraw into their homes. These are mostly young people (between 15 and 35) and mostly young men. The focus of this presentation is how hikikomori constitute a challenge to dominant national imaginaries of Japan as a ‘corporate-family system’ (Allison 2013). This presentation analyses popular media and psychiatric representations of hikikomori, particularly from Saitô’s (2013) work as exemplifying Ahmed’s (2014) notion of willful subjects. It is argued that the hikikomori’s apparent willfulness produces them as Queer subjects who are out of place and pace with the dominant heteronormative, masculinist culture of contemporary Japan.

Speaker: 

Rosemary Overell completed a doctorate, majoring in cultural studies and Japanese studies, at the University of Melbourne in 2012. Her thesis, Brutal: Affect Belonging In, and Between, Australia and Japan’s Grindcore Scenes, explored how fans of grindcore metal music feel ‘at home’ in scenic spaces. Rosemary’s research included two years of ethnographic fieldwork in Osaka, Japan, as well as in Melbourne, Australia. Rosemary has taught for a number of years at the University of Melbourne in cultural studies, Asian studies, media studies and cultural geography. Between 2011 and 2013 she co-ordinated subjects on popular music cultures and lifestyle and consumer cultures.

In 2014, Rosemary published her book Affective Intensities in Extreme Music Scene with Palgrave. Currently, she is teaching two second-year communications subjects and working on nikkeijin migrants and youth cultures in Nagoya, Japan. She is also interested in experimental ethnographic methodologies.

She is also a member of the Performance of the Real research theme steering group.

20 April 2018
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

NUS Central Library
CLB-04-04, Theatrette 1

If you are an NUS Staff or Student, please register at cnmn.us/queer

Invited Speaker at King’s College London- Assistant Professor Taberez Ahmed Neyazi

Dr. Taberez Ahmed Neyazi has been invited to speak at the Transnational Law Summit 2018, which is being convened under the theme: The New Human Condition: Creating Justice for Our Future at King’s College London, from 10-13 April 2018. As part of the critical inquiry into the crisis of democracy, the rise of authoritarianism and populism the Summit will discuss on the crucial role of journalism in activism and societal reaction.  Dr. Neyazi will be speaking on the impact of new media on political ‘voice’, protest and representation, as part of a deeper inquiry into the ‘transformation of the public sphere’ and into new formations of resistance and democratic power. The participants in the Summit include Journalists, Artists, Academics, International Organisations, NGOs, Cities, Courts, Social Movements, and the Arts.