CNM Research Talk: Witnessing Suffering, Narrative Data, Autoethnographic Analysis, and Communicative Responsibility- Presented By Fulbright Scholar Professor Barbara Sharf

Abstract:

Medical humanities scholars have repeatedly made the case for the ethical importance of clinicians enacting attention, presence, and empathy to witness the stories of illness-related suffering disclosed by patients. However, the concept of witnessing has not received adequate attention in the communication literature (health communication or otherwise).

In this presentation, storied accounts of three instances of witnessing the tense precipice between living and dying experienced by patients being treated for critical illnesses in hospital intensive care units are described from the perspective of a non-clinician. Instead of these data being gathered through interviews or focus groups, they are instead drawn from [my own] personal participant-observation that includes a great deal of obvious subjectivity, interpersonal connection, and evoked emotions. So, is this data that counts as a form of research? Post-hoc reflection on these narrative accounts is unabashedly auto-ethnographic. Does authoethnographic analysis have validity and integrity as a scholarly venue? All of us are asked to consider what are the important aspects and responsibilities of being witness to another’s suffering.

Speaker: 

Barbara Sharf is a health communication researcher with research interests encompassing a wide variety of health-related topics. She is best-known for works employing qualitative forms of investigation and analysis, particularly narrative inquiry. She is the author or co-author of three books, the most recent being Storied Health and Illness: Communicating Personal, Cultural, and Political Complexities (2017), and more than 75 academic journal articles and book chapters. Currently Professor Emerita in the Department of Communication at Texas A & M, she remains active in conducting and publishing research. Her work has been honored as Outstanding Health Communication Scholar (2005) and Distinguished Health Communication Article (2017) by the National Communication Association. For the past decade, her work has focused on communicative aspects of integrative health care, specifically how culturally-based, complementary systems and modalities of healing have moved toward institutionalization within conventional, biomedical organizations. As a U.S. Fulbright Research Scholar, she has visited NUS for the last three years in the Department of Communication and New Media to extend her studies to Singapore.

2 February 2018
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

NUS Libraries, Central Library
National University of Singapore
CLB-04-04, Theatrette 1

Register at cnmn.us/witness.

CARE Research Talk: Critical Digital Health Studies, Now And In The Future- Presented By Professor Deborah Lupton

Abstract:

Digital technologies have risen to meet the challenge of delivering better healthcare, containing medical costs and getting people to engage more actively in the promotion of health, fitness, well-being as well as self-care for chronic conditions. In medical journals, public health literature, industry forums and ministries, discussion has been intense, but mired in an overly utopian and individualistic approach to digital health technologies. In this talk, Professor Deborah Lupton will outline what defines critical digital health studies, in which the socio-cultural, ethical and political implications are identified. She will then delve into her current research, and share some ideas to shape the future of digital health studies.

Speaker: 

Deborah Lupton is Centenary Research Professor in the News & Media Research Centre, Faculty of Arts & Design, University of Canberra. She is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, leader of the Smart Technology Living Lab at the University of Canberra, and the co-leader of the Digital Data & Society Consortium. Her latest books are Digital Sociology (Routledge, 2015), The Quantified Self (Polity, 2016) and Digital Health (Routledge, 2017), as well as the edited volumes Digitised Health, Medicine and Risk (Routledge, 2016), The Digital Academic (Routledge, 2017, co-edited with Inger Mewburn and Pat Thomson) and Self-Tracking, Health and Medicine (2017). Her current research interests all involve aspects of digital sociology: digital health, digital data cultures, self-tracking practices, digital food cultures, digitised academia, and the digital surveillance of children and young people.

19 January 2018
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
National University of Singapore

VENUE CHANGED!
Blk AS6, #03-38, CNM Playroom
Lecture Theatre 10 (Beside the Arts Canteen)

Register at cnmn.us/digitalhealth.

The New Paper: NUS Communications and New Media’s Groundbreaking Module on Fake News Featured

NUS’ Department of Communications and New Media’s groundbreaking module- NM2303 Fake News, Lies and Spin: How to Sift Fact From Fiction– is featured in the New Paper.

To fight fake news, tertiary institutions have introduced lessons to help students differentiate fact from fiction. Three polytechnics and three universities told The New Paper they recently introduced courses to tackle the growing problem, which has worsened globally. This move is timely as the Government steps up its own battle against fake news…

Source: The New Paper

CNM Research Talk: Reality Television As Global Form- Presented By Associate Professor Biswarup Sen

Abstract:

Reality television has become an important part of popular culture. In recent decades, reality shows like American Idol, Big Brother, Survivor and Donald Trump’s The Apprentice have attracted a worldwide audience, adding to more traditional forms of fictional storytelling associated with the novel, cinema and broadcast entertainment. Reality TV is a distinct kind of cultural phenomenon, one that is based on the uniqueness of the format, crossing borders in terms of production and distribution, and structurally constituted by the logic of neo-liberal subject formation. It serves as a global form that helps us understand the cultural impact of globalisation.

Speaker: 

Associate Professor Biswarup Sen has been teaching as an adjunct instructor at the School of Journalism and Communication since 2004.

He worked as a journalist in India before coming to the United States for graduate work in journalism and communication. He taught for several years in the Department of English, General Literature, and Rhetoric at the State University of New York, Binghamton, where he was a member of the University Diversity Task Force and served as an advisor to the student-run Harpur Academic Review. He has also worked as a consultant for a marketing firm and an internet-based company and as a communications specialist for nonprofit organizations.

17 January 2018
3:00 PM – 4:30 PM

Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
National University of Singapore
Blk AS6, #03-38
CNM Playroom

Register at cnmn.us/realitytv.