Research Talk by Dr. Alex Mitchell

“What I Talk About When I Talk About Interactive Stories”

 

Date: Wednesday, 29 August, 2012

Time: 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM

Venue: CNM Playroom, AS6, #03-38, 11 Computing Drive, Singapore 117416, NUS

Google Map:

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msa=0&msid=216145972968108395697.0004aac0a1d6b58712a85

 

Abstract

In this talk, I will give an overview of my research at the intersection of storytelling, games and interactive media design. My early work looked at collaboration and storytelling, investigating the impact of a shared workspace on writers’ development of shared understanding. I have also developed shared virtual spaces for learning through storytelling and play, and games and interactive artworks which explore various aspects of interactivity. I will connect this earlier work to my recent research, which has focused on rereading in interactive stories, and discuss my plans to further explore the aesthetics and poetics of interactive media in the context of interactive storytelling.

 

About the speaker:

Dr. Alex Mitchell teaches interactive media design in the Department of Communications and New Media at the National University of Singapore. He has a B.Sc. and an M.Sc. in Computer Science from the University of Toronto, and recently completed his PhD at the NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, where he was attached to the Partner Technologies Research Group. Alex’s current research investigates various aspects of computer-based art and entertainment, focusing in particular on interactive stories. This work involves creating digital and non-digital interactive storytelling systems, using these systems to develop creative works, and observing how people respond to the resulting pieces. It also involves theoretical work to understand what is happening in and around this process.

 

 

 

Research Talk by Mr. Patrick Sharbaugh

“Look But Don’t Touch: Conceptions of Online Personal Privacy in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam”

 

Date: Wednesday, 29 August, 2012

Time: 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Venue: CNM Playroom, AS6, #03-38, 11 Computing Drive, Singapore 117416, NUS

Google Map:

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msa=0&msid=216145972968108395697.0004aac0a1d6b58712a85

 

Abstract:

Is privacy as an idea and a practice a purely Western notion? Is it limited to developed societies? Is privacy incompatible with collectivist traditions? In an era defined by ever more ways of sharing the intimate details of our personal lives and ever fewer ways of controlling that information, these questions matter more than ever. Vietnam-based lecturer and researcher Patrick Sharbaugh shares the results of his recent study of how Vietnamese netizens think about online personal privacy, revealing a picture that seems to differ from many of the most commonly accepted ideas about what privacy means and why we care about it.

 

About the speaker:

Mr. Patrick Sharbaugh teaches and conducts research into new media technologies and practices at RMIT International University in Saigon, Vietnam, where he teaches Asian Cybercultures, Theories of Communication, and Negotiating Strategies. He has a B.S. in Biological Sciences and a M.A. in Journalism and Mass Communications from his home state of South Carolina in the U.S. His most recent research is on the topic of Vietnamese conceptions of online personal privacy, which he presented this year at the 7th Global Cybercultures Conference in Prague, Czech Republic, and at the International Communication Association’s New Media and Citizenship in Asia preconference in Phoenix, AZ.

Research Talk by Mr. Gudur Raghavendra Reddy

“Multidisciplinary Approach to Designing for Ageing Population”

 

Date: Wednesday, 22 August 2012

Time: 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM

Venue: CNM Playroom, AS6, #03-38, 11 Computing Drive, Singapore 117416

Google Map:

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msa=0&msid=216145972968108395697.0004aac0a1d6b58712a85

 

Abstract

Designing accessible interfaces for older people is a very unique and multi-faceted challenge. Designers tend to simplify users into two groups: either “standard” users with perfect vision, cognitive processing, motor control, technologically savvy, or the “old” users, which are exactly the opposite. Recent research suggests that this is a wrong assumption mostly arising from studies that use very small sample sizes with one or two narrow age groups at the extremes of age continuum. This does not reflect nor it offers a useful model for the complex multigenerational reality. In addition, these studies tend to focus only on the effects of chronological age as variable and do not consider cognitive and social aspects of ageing as important. In reality, older people are a very heterogeneous group in terms of their capabilities but also in terms of their dynamically changing needs. To truly understand their needs and to design for them we need to support a multi-disciplinary approach to research that focuses less on the age variable and more on the source of age-related differences. In this talk I will present how my recent research comprehensively addresses these issues by leveraging my earlier industry and research experience in visual design, interaction design, product development and technology. I will further discuss my future plans in the field of design support of independent living for the elderly and self-care medical Devices.

 

Speaker’s bio:

Mr. Gudur Raghavendra Reddy (Raghu) is awaiting conferment of his PhD from Creative Industries Faculty, Queensland University of Technology. His thesis research focus was on making contemporary technological products more accessible for older people. He also holds a Master of Design in Visual Communication from the, Industrial Design Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay and a Diploma in Fine Arts from Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University.
Before starting his PhD, for eight years, Raghu taught user-experience design, visual communication, new media content development and design project management modules at Communications and New Media Department, National University of Singapore. He was teaching after extensive industry and research work experience in interactive multimedia, online distributed virtual environment games, 3-D modeling, animation, information design, publication design and video production & post-production. He is also a fine arts photographer, working exclusively with traditional black and white techniques.