WEvolve campaign brings young men and women together to end gender violence

World Bank in collaboration with other partners has recently launched a global campaign titled “WEvolve”, which

“brings men and women together to end inequality using the power of art and media to inspire action and change”.

WEvolve provides a platform for young men and women to change societal norms by empowering them to open their minds, reach out to their peers and elders and become leaders, who think and act differently.

If you are a young man or woman and you are passionate about gender-related issues and eager to contribute to ending gender-based violence check out the WEvolve campaign’s website, and learn about those tools available for you to get involved in the global campaign to end gender violence.  Don’t miss out on this opportunity!

Women in Media Uniting to Bridge the Confidence Gap

While the issue of women in tech is widely discussed, another area, which would not patently be the topic for the gender discussion, is women in media. The Australian Business Review uncovers the role of women in the media market and highlights an important factor – confidence factor – determining gender balance in media, which can, actually, be defining women’s advancement in any area women are engaged in. Read the full article here.

Saudi Prince Pledges $32 Billion to Good Causes, With Women’s Rights a Focus

Link

A good move for Saudi Arabia, which is known to be widely criticized for its women inequality. Looking forward to read the strategy to learn more on the planned actions to improve gender equality in the country. A full article can be accessed through the following link: http://www.wsj.com/articles/saudi-prince-pledges-32-billion-to-charity-with-womens-rights-a-key-focus-1435762281

 

WPLA marks International Women’s Day 2015

This year to mark the International Women’s Day, WPLA in collaboration with the LKYSPP Bridging Gender and Policy Group partnered with the leading tech companies to host a panel discussion. The event was widely attended by the students, staff and members of the public.

Photo Courtesy of Bridging GAP Group

The panel discussion focused on “Women Leaders in Technology: Why We Do What We Do?” and featured a panel of four remarkable women leaders from such tech companies as Microsoft, HP, Twitter and ConneXionsAsia.

  • Amelia Agrawal, Regional Director of OEM Marketing, Microsoft
  • Elizabeth Hernandez, Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Asia Pacific & Japan, HP
  • Frederique Covington, International Marketing Director, Twitter
  • Rosaline Chow Koo, Founder and CEO, ConneXionsAsia

Dr. Astrid S. Tuminez was the moderator of the discussion.

The panelists shared their unique personal stories of how they achieved career success in the technology sector and the challenges they encountered along the way, whether the work-life balance is a myth, and how they contributed to the success of their companies.

One of the takeaways of the event relates to the risk women associate with the career in tech: “Are women less risk-taking, therefore less attracted to high-stakes tech industry? There is a steep learning curve that requires some confidence to take, not just in tech. Mentors need to convey to girls that it’s important to take risks.”

CANq5qCVEAANC41

Photo Courtesy of Bridging GAP Group

 

15 Women That Are Changing The World in 2015

Students take part during the “One Billion Rising” dance campaign at all-girls school St Scholastica college in Manila

Photo Courtesy of World Economic Forum

 

In anticipation of International Women’s Day 2015 World Economic Forum shares the stories of 15 women changing the world in 2015. Read on the stories of these remarkable bright women to get inspired to work harder towards achieving your goals and creating gender-inclusive environment: https://agenda.weforum.org/2015/03/15-women-changing-the-world-in-2015/?utm_content=buffer5c0ba&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer. 

 

 

 

Microsoft Taiwan Empowers the Next Generation of Female Entrepreneurs

One of the goals of the Women’s Pathways to Leadership in Asia (WPLA) project is to highlight successful initiatives promoting the advancement of women in the Asia Region. Microsoft is an industry leader in promoting diversity in the workplace and fostering female talent.

In Taiwan, Microsoft has launched a GIRLS Power Up internship programme. The goal of this leading internship program is to partnership with academic institutions to help young and aspiring businesswomen to become entrepreneurs. GIRLS Power Up was first initiated at the Taipei Chengshih University of Science and Technology (TPCU), National Chung Hsing University and WuFeng University.

Taipei Chengshih University of Science and Technology (TPCU) students Liao Yu-Syuan and Hsieh You-Qi shared their experiences at the Microsoft GIRLS Power Up press conference

Photo courtesy of Microsoft Citizenship Asia Pacific

According to a recent publication by Microsoft Citizenship Asia Pacific,  approximately “180 female students have participated in the programme and were successfully matched to 36 ‘micro-internship’ teams to experience running a business venture and hone their entrepreneurial interests.” Throughout the course of the program, participants receive valuable skills training including social networking and online marketing skills needed for young women to succeed in their future ‘micro business venture.’

In a recent press conference highlighting the progress of GIRLS Power Up Programme, Sally Wang, a successful female entrepreneur told the audience how her company gained from offering these internship opportunities by stating, “The students that I’ve worked with are fully dedicated to this programme, and I am really thankful to have this chance to interact with this group of students. I am most impressed by their positive attitude and creative marketing ideas.”

Young female entrepreneurs benefit from the practical experience they gain through the program. Hsieh You-Qi, a business administration degree student at TPCU and current participant of the program, expressed the value of this experience by saying that “Thanks to GIRLS Power Up, I now have a deeper understanding of many aspects of entrepreneurship. I hope to use what I’ve learned to fulfill my dreams of setting up my own business in the future.” In particular, the program has provided her the skills to differentiate her product offerings and leverage social media to effectively market new products.

According to Vincent Shih, Legal and Corporate Affairs Director at Microsoft Taiwan, “The main purpose of the GIRLS Power Up programme is to provide a platform for young Taiwanese women to take the first step in digital learning through small-scale business ventures, which entail less risk and help them develop their entrepreneurial potential. This internship programme is designed to enable them to pick up the critical skills and knowledge to cope with the challenges of operating a business venture.” Thanks to these innovative initiatives, Microsoft is empowering the next generation of female entrepreneurs and empowering women in the Asia Region.
For more information
For more information on the GIRLS Power Up programme please visit the following link: Taiwan’s GIRLS Power Up programme 

 

 

Empowering Women in Vietnam

The recent event “Empowerment of Women in the Public Sector in the Context of International Integration” held in Hanoi, focused on furthering the dialogue on women’s leadership in Asia. The event brought together experts in the industry, business leaders and policy makers from the public and private sectors, representatives of ministries and departments, academics and government representatives from more than 20 provinces and cities in the country.

The agenda of advancement of women in the public sector took center stage. UNDP Country Director Louise Chamberlain expressed the importance of women by stating that they have half of all decision-making positions given they make up half of the world population.

Photo courtesy of Vietnam News.  

 “Promoting women’s participation in the public sector was not only a matter of justice, but also a matter of ensuring all perspectives are brought forward as men and women bring divergent experiences to the table,” she said.

Experts proposed eliminating the disparity in retirement age between men and women as a means to promote women’s leadership in the public sector and counter gender disparities. Bakhodir Burkhanov, UNDP Country deputy director, stated that the gender differential in the mandatory age of retirement, which is 55 for women and 60 for men, was the main barrier to women’s participation in the political system. The disparity also limited their chances for promotion and access to training and development given that taking women out of the pool for promotions earlier than men meant fewer women occupied senior positions.

Citing recent research from the report “Rising to the Top? Women’s Leadership in Asia,” Regional Director of Microsoft Astrid S. Tuminez expressed the need to address cultural norms and persistent prejudices against women and girls that hinder women’s advancement. The former vice dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy recommended approaches for policy makers in Vietnam in an effort to enhance the capacity of leadership for women working in State agencies. In addition, she proposed creation of a government fund focused on implementing gender equality policies and enhance gender education to change the perception of women and girls. Nguyen Phuong Nga, Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs, stressed the importance of the quality of human resources, particularly women’s leadership capacity in the public sector in Vietnam.

International and local experts devised strategies such as merit-based hiring systems, training for female civil servants, and promotion of men’s role in household and childcare roles in order to promote women’s advancement and strengthen women’s rights. Vietnam proposed the organized and international friends to concentrate direct support for these objectives, specific targets of the strategy, especially the national programme on gender equality between 2011-2015. The importance of women’s role was seen crucial in promoting economic growth and social development in both developing and developed nations.

For additional information on the event, please click on this link.