February 2015

You are browsing the site archives for February 2015.

Transboundary Radiation Pollution

With reference to an article by Helmut (2011) from the Fordham Environmental Law Review, I will be touching on the issue of transboundary radiation pollution.  “An accident at a nuclear power plant could release highly radioactive materials into the environment. Since radioactive pollution can travel through the air, infiltrate waterways, or disperse into the sea, opportunities abound […]

Waste Management – Repository sites and threats to water bodies Pt. II

Waste Management - Repository sites and threats to water bodies Pt. II

Picking up from where I left of in the previous post, I highlighted the role of water in the risk of radiation pollution of water bodies. With reference to the pollution transfer continuum, water may both be a mobilisation mechanism by dissolving radionuclides, and also a transportation mechanism by carrying these dissolved radionuclides into larger water bodies via groundwater […]

Waste Management – Repository sites and threats to water bodies Pt. I

Waste Management - Repository sites and threats to water bodies Pt. I

My previous post touched on geologic disposal of radioactive wastes and substances. Continuing from there, I will touch on disposal in repository sites, where not only natural but man-made barriers are utilised in ensuring the isolation of these substances. Additionally, I will also introduce one consideration – water – that is crucial in ensuring the […]

Waste Management – Geologic Disposal

Waste Management - Geologic Disposal

This week, I will be drawing upon an article from K. R. Rao (2001) titled ‘Radioactive waste: The problem and its management’. To start off, here is one quote cited in the article: ‘The stuff we are dealing with can’t go away until it decays. You can containerise it, solidify it, immobilise it and move it, but […]

Radioactive Wastes and Pollution – Some issues and concerns

Any activity that produces or uses radioactive materials generates radioactive waste. Other than natural sources of radioactivity that I have mentioned in the previous post, there is also artificial radioactivity. Two main sources have been: The civilian nuclear programmes including nuclear power production, medical and industrial applications of radioactive nuclides The military nuclear programme, including atmospheric […]

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