NUS CatCafé

Helping the cat community in NUS

CAT FAQs

COMMUNITY CATS

A community cat is commonly known as a stray cat, but we think the word ‘community’ better describes these cats. Calling them stray cats gives one the impression that these cats don’t have a home- but they do have a home, which is the environment they live here on campus!

Some of these community cats have been residents on campus for much longer than even some of the students or faculty, long enough to have taken a PHD!

(Adapted from http://www.catwelfare.org/faq#t6n59 )

 

PROPER FEEDING PROCEDURE

DO NOT FEED OUR CAMPUS CATS WITHOUT PERMISSION.

Most of them have a feeder/team assigned to them and some have dietary requirements.  If you see a seemingly hungry cat, drop an email to us or message the project director. If you’re interested in feeding, please drop us an email.

1. Feeder should feed at a fixed timing/schedule.

2. Feeder should feed at an out-of-the-way location with little human traffic.

3. Clean up after feeding to avoid attracting pests. ALWAYS use a container or a paper plate.

4. Although NUS Cat Café does not sponsor the food supply, feeders may contact us for advice for cheaper rates.

CATS IN RESTRICTED AREAS

1. Cats may be attracted to an area with food. Occupants are advised to search for the root of problem and remove any food supply to prevent unauthorized entry.

2. To discourage the cat from entering an area, splash a small amount of water at it each time it enters.
After several occasions, the cat will understand the out-of-bound area

3. Neutered cats are found to be less likely to intrude an area, hence highlighting the importance of the Trap-Neuter-Return-Manage (TNRM) system in NUS to manage the cats’ population here.

 

FEAR/DISCOMFORT TOWARDS CATS

1. Make sudden, loud noises to keep cat out (Eg. clapping or stamping of foot)

2. Splash some water at the cat if it approaches.

3. Consider making a detour, if necessary, to avoid the presence of the cat.

 

NOISE/DISTURBANCE

NUS implements the Trap-Neuter-Return-Manage (TNRM) system to stabilize the cat population within campus. Each cat will defend its own territory, hence by sterilizing all resident cats in NUS, we are able to prevent the growth of litters as well as new entry cats.

In addition, sterilization helps to substantially reduce nuisance behavior, such as aggression and caterwauling. This minimizes the amount of disturbance or discomfort to all students and staff in NUS.

Thanks to Weiling we have this comprehensive compilation of “Dos” and “Don’ts” for future reference:
1. What do I do when I spot a new cat in school?
  • Report sighting on our facebook page.
  • Check cat’s age and gender.
  • Determine if the cat has been neutered
  • Determine its friendliness
    – A trapper may be required if the cat is not approachable and if it requires sterilization
  • Confirm that the cat is regularly sighted in the area
2. What is the appropriate age for sterilization of a cat?
  • Around 3-4 months for female cats;<6 months for male cats
2. How to identify FIV(feline version of HIV) ?
  • Rapid weight loss
  • Decrease in appetite.
  • Loss of luster in cat fur.
3. What to do when I find a dead body of a cat?
  • Kittens may suffer from Fading Kitten Syndrome due to lack of responsive immune system (the feline equivalent of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)
  • Check for signs of a fight.
    • Obvious wounds.
    • Check for fur under the nails (if you are comfortable with going close)
  • Disposal – Inform Campus Security by calling 6874–1616.
  • Check for signs of abuse.
    • Signs of vomiting may indicate poisoning
    • Bleeding from nostril may indicate blunt force trauma
    • Report to SPCA (http://www.spca.org.sg/contact.asp) or CWS (http://www.catwelfare.org/contact-us).
    • Don’t move the body from the location if abuse is suspected. Stay with the body until the respective organisation arrives if possible.
    • First point of contact in NUS campus is OED.
      • Check if there are any security cameras
4. How should I go about feeding a cat?

DO NOT FEED OUR CAMPUS CATS WITHOUT PERMISSION.

Most of them have a feeder/team assigned to them and some have dietary requirements.  If you see a seemingly hungry cat, drop an email to us or message the project director. If you’re interested in feeding, please drop us an email.

  • Keep the food away and only feed the cat during specific hours
    • Some people dislike cats. Feeding them during quieter hours reduces complaints
  • Clean up the food after half an hour.
    • Any leftover food is food the cat cannot finish.
  • Feed begging cats approx 2 tablespoons of food (Or the same volume as a clenched fist)
  • For stray cats outside campus, it is preferable to feed moist food as dry food may result in dehydration if water is not readily available
5. Is it okay to allow cats to share food with other cats?
  • Stray cats will always have mites and ticks.
  • Chances are they are already interacting together if they come and eat together so there is no difference in preventing them from sharing food
  • It is not really possible to stop one cat from eating food while allowing another cat to at the same time and location
6. What food do the cats in school eat?
  • Sanabelle Adult with Fine Trout Formula
  • 1st Choice Adult Chicken Formula

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