Apr 16 2010

Fig Tree and Fig Wasp = Babysitter and Matchmaker

Published by under species interactions

Fig trees (Ficus sp.) are considered as a keystone species in Singapore rainforest. This is because they flower and fruit frequently, offering frugivorous animals a year-round supply of food. The figs are actually an enclosed inflorescence known as syconium, within which a unique mutualistic relationship between the plants and fig wasps take place. Fig wasp […]

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Apr 15 2010

What Are “Hens” Doing Near The Lake?

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During one of my recent visits to the Singapore Botanic Gardens on 14th April 2010, I was strolling across the bridge located at the second swan lake, when I spotted a few White- Breasted Waterhens (Amaurornis phoenicurus) in this vicinity. Some were in shallow regions (<20cm) of the lake and a few on open grass […]

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Apr 15 2010

Spotting these spots

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Symbiotic associations between some shrimps and sea anemones are common in the tropics (Bruce, 1976). The Five-spot anemone shrimp (Periclimenes brevicarpalis) is one such example.   This adorable little shrimp is about 4cm long and known as the Five-spot anemone shrimp because of its 5 unique spots found on its tail which are black with […]

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Apr 15 2010

Going my way? Blood sucking hitch-hikers!

Published by under parasitism

I came across this photo taken by Horace Tan while blog-surfing recently and at first glance mistook the bright red object for the butterfly’s eye. Upon closer inspection of both the photo and the site itself, I realized that it is in actual fact, a mite! ‘What in the name of ecology is a mite doing […]

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Apr 14 2010

Alien VS Native

An example of how introduced species can affect the ecosystem as well as affect the population of the native species would be the introduction of changeable lizards into Singapore. The changeable lizards (Calotes versicolor), as seen in picture below, are�the introduced species in Singapore while the�native species in Singapore are the green-crested lizard (Bronchocela cristaella). […]

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Apr 14 2010

Munchy Monkeys: Feeding Frenzy

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People feeding macaques (from wildsingapore, 2007) When I was young, I witnessed many well-meaning visitors tossing peanuts to the monkeys in Bukit Timah Nature Reserve. This sight has decreased considerably ever since the feeding of monkeys in nature reserves was made a fineable offence in 1997. Many long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) inhabit forest edges which […]

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Apr 14 2010

Squirrels encountered along the PIE Expressway

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I was amazed when I saw 2 squirrels running across the PIE expressway near my former JC- Catholic Junior College (CJC) at Whitley Road. It was an interesting yet frightening scene at that time because squirrels can be sighted in our urban environment despite the heavy traffic flow on the roads. It was later found […]

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Apr 14 2010

The Mutual Affair

Published by under species interactions

Have you ever noticed and wondered why Coral Reefs out skirting the southern islands of Singapore appear to be in various colours?  This is due to the presence of Mutualistic Relationship between the Reef-building hard corals (Order Scleractinia) and the Zooxanthellae, Symbiodinium spp. These microscopic single cell algae live within the corals’ polyp tissues and are […]

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Apr 11 2010

Three blind lady beetles… see how they prey!

Published by under species interactions

Remember being fascinated by these pretty brightly-coloured “ladybirds” when you were in primary school? Frequently spotted where their prey are seen, lady beetles (Family Coccinellidae) are natural predators for countering pest control in gardens. Curiously, they seem to be able to sense the location of their prey even though they are as blind as a […]

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