RU Month Competition – Winners

Researcher Unbound Contest

Our Researcher Unbound (RU) Month in September has come to an end and wow, what a month we’ve had! From text mining and visualisation workshops to publishing talks and reference management classes – we’ve tried to bring you a whole gamut of educational offerings that will help you navigate the research lifecycle. We hope you’ve enjoyed the ride and remain ready for more in the months to come!

In conjunction with the RU month, we also held a competition to solicit comments from workshop participants on how the RU month workshops benefitted them. These are the lucky winners of a Starbucks card! A separate email will be sent to the winners – thank you for your participation!

  1. Wong Liang Tai, David (04XXX8)
  2. Loh Hui En Iris (A0131XXXX)
  3. Chen Yingying (06XXX8)
  4. Chow Suet Yee, Joanne (A0172XXXX)
  5. Foo Chuan De (06XXX4)
  6. Chang Jen-Shuan (A0152XXXX)
  7. Tan Chia Jie (A0176XXXX)
  8. Karthic Anbalakan (A0086XXXX)
  9. Ong Chi Yin (05XXX5)
  10. Muhammad Avicenna Naradipa (A0151XXXX)
  11. Cheng Tze Min Michelle (06XXX6)
  12. Cheung Fang Ting (A0172XXXX)

Here’s what some of you had to say!

Talk attended – The Simple Guide to Understanding Patents

RU month has benefitted me in terms of increasing my knowledge and interest in patents. The wide range of workshops was insightful as it highlighted the number of research methods which I am unaware of. The workshop was informative and detailed which allowed me to learn efficiently and effectively. RU month has exposed me to the resources available in NUS especially being a student in my first year, it was an eye opener. I believe RU month in the near future will be useful and I’ll continue to participate actively if time permits.” 

– Cheung Fang Ting –

——–

Talk attended: Art of Questioning and Journal Publishing: Under Review

The philosopher Francis Bacon once said: “Half of science is putting forth the right questions.” He failed to mention; however, how difficult it was to find the right question. As a graduate student, like so many others, I am currently attempting to find and hopefully answer that question. This is a process, I’ve come to realise, which involves a lot of late nights and an unhealthy amount of coffee. However, the RU workshops I have attended have helped me sleep a little better.

As graduate students, regardless of discipline, we often find ourselves buried under monumental amounts of readings. Sadly, not all of them are pertinent to our research which leads to wasted time, frustration and some claim hair loss. The first talk I attended was especially useful in helping me protect my hair. It provided a sound framework to skim through papers quickly, in order to discern their relevance, as well as make the search for papers more efficient. The second workshop was instructive on how to avoid the common pitfalls when publishing a paper. It was very insightful to learn about the publication process from the reviewer’s point of view. I intend to make these workshops a regular part of my schedule and have already signed up for another.

Admittedly, while I am writing this partly in hopes of winning a Starbucks gift card (to support my caffeine addiction), I do strongly recommend this series of workshops to all graduate students, especially those just starting their studies.”

– Karthic Anbalakan –

——-

And some of you got visual as well!

Talk attended: Navigating the Research Journey: Trials and Triumphs of an Early Career Researcher

More about the Imposter Syndrome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

– Muhammad Avicenna Naradipa –

Leave a Reply