CNM-CARE Research Talk: The Bandung Doctrine On Decolonisation- By Professor Kuan-Hsing Chen

Abstract:

The Bandung Conference transformed the global dynamics that had been shaped by imperialism and colonialism, breaking away from the binarism of socialist and capitalist ideals. And with the rapid ascent of nations like Africa, Asia, the Carribbean and Latin-America, the history of conquest can now be brought to light, examined and understood. Professor Kuan-Hsing Chen argues that this re-examination will lead to solidarity across all sectors. Only when programmes like Indonesia’s New Marine Time and China’s One Belt, One Road are understood through the lens of the Bandung spirit of decolonisation, can they be connected intellectually and politically. This not only demands a critical re-examination of histories, but also challenge existing modes of knowledge that were shaped by European colonisers for the past two hundred years.

Speaker: 

A self-claimed Bandungist, Kuan-Hsing Chen works in the Center for Asia-Pacific Cultural Studies, Hsinchu. Founding Chair of the board of trustee for the Inter-Asia School (an international NPO). He taught in Chiao Tung University (2008-2017), Tsing Hua University (1990-2008) and has held (and is still having long term affiliation with) visiting professorships at universities in China, Ethiopia, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Singapore, Thailand, Uganda, Ethiopia, and the US.

28 Feb 2018
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Block AS7, #01-06

Register at cnmn.us/bandung.

CNM-CARE Research Talk: Repositioning The World’s Health- By Professor Sanjoy Bhattacharya

Abstract:

What is the World Health Organisation? Its Headquarters in Geneva? Or, is it a more dispersed international entity, which engages and deals with disparate polities in order to stay effective and relevant? In all this, how can we conceptualise the historic formation, underpinning negotiations and impact of the WHO Regional Offices, which are the legal entities that negotiate and work with national governments on a daily basis? Professor Sanjoy Bhattacharya uses recent histories of international and global health projects to question a series of presumptions that continue to colonise scholarship about the value of the idea and work of a relatively small sets of actors. In so doing, he argues for the need for greater transparency and democracy in inter-sectoral partnerships that aims to improve global health and well-being.

Speaker: 

Sanjoy Bhattacharya is Professor in the History of Medicine Department of History, University of York, UK. He studied at St. Stephen’s College, University of Delhi (India); Jawaharlal Nehru University (New Delhi, India), and the School of Oriental and African Studies (London, UK). He is a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator working on the history and contemporary workings of Primary Health Care and the provision of Universal Health Coverage in South Asia. Sanjoy also continues to work on the histories of the worldwide eradication of smallpox, and the migration, experiences and contribution of South Asian doctors in the UK’s National Health Service.

1 March 2018
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

VENUE CHANGED

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Block AS6, Lecture Theatre 14 (LT14)

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Block AS6, #03-33, CNM Meeting Room

Register at cnmn.us/who.

The Role of Indigenous Rights In Rainforest Preservation, Two Perspectives: Presented by Joe Lamb and Dr Jose Fragoso

WHY YOU NEED TO ATTEND: Indigenous groups in Sarawak, Malaysia, when faced with a large-scale development project that would displace thousands of people, and destroy large swathes of rainforest, launched a successful campaign to stop the construction of the Baram Dam. Learn how the land’s natives worked together with researchers from the University of California to propose alternative sources of energy that would be less costly, less fragile, and more efficient. The collaboration remains an example of how research can not only redefine the foundations of development that respects both human rights and the environment, but also amplify the voices of communities.

Date: 6 November 2017
Time: 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Venue: Research Division Seminar Room, Block AS7, #06-42, Shaw Foundation Building

Register Online

Talk- Culturally Centering Diet among Malays in Singapore: Building a Healthy Heart

NUS Communications and New Media’s CARE initiative is excited to organise the CARE Social Justice Series, showcasing projects that CARE has embarked on. This coming Monday, 3 April 2017, Prof Mohan J Dutta (Director of CARE and Head of NUS Department of Communications and New Media) and Ms Munirah Bashir (CARE Research Assistant) will speak on the topic Culturally Centering Diet among Malays in Singapore: Building a Healthy Heart.

CARE-CNM Research Series by Dr Gary L. Kreps

CARE-CNM is pleased to host Professor Gary L. Kreps for a one-day workshop followed by a research talk on “Translational Communication Scholarship”on the 19th January 17 (9am to 3pm) and 20th January 17 (3-4pm). Translational Communication Inquiry is designed to address important societal issues and improve quality of life. More information on this series can be found in the poster below. Register for this series by clicking on the poster below. Hope to see you there!

CARE-CNM Research Series by Dr Gary L. Kreps

CARE-CNM is pleased to host Professor Gary L. Kreps for a one-day workshop followed by a research talk on “Translational Communication Scholarship”on the 19th January 17 (9am to 3pm) and 20th January 17 (3-4pm). Translational Communication Inquiry is designed to address important societal issues and improve quality of life. More information on this series can be found in the poster below. Register for this series by clicking on the poster below. Hope to see you there!