“Food Insecurity in Singapore: The Communicative (Dis)Value of the Lived Experiences of the Poor”

“Food Insecurity in Singapore: The Communicative (Dis)Value of the Lived Experiences of the Poor” – This journal article co-authored with Naomi Tan, Satveer Kaur, Prof Mohan Dutta, and Nina Venkataraman just got published in the Health Communication! Here is a link for 50 free downloads. Link: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10410236.2016.1196416 Abstract: “Food insecurity is a form of health disparity that results in adverse health outcomes, particularly among disenfranchised and vulnerable populations. Using the culture-centered approach, this article engages with issues of food insecurity, health, and poverty among the low-income community in Singapore. Through 30 in-depth interviews, the narratives of the food insecure are privileged in articulating their lived experiences of food insecurity and in co-constructing meanings of health informed by their sociocultural context, in a space that typically renders them invisible. Arguing that poverty is communicatively sustained through the erasure of subaltern voices from mainstream discourses and policy platforms, we ask the research question: What are the meanings of food insecurity in the everyday experiences of health among the poor in Singapore? Our findings demonstrate that the meanings of health among the food insecure are constituted in culture and materiality, structurally constrained, and ultimately complexify their negotiations of health and health decision making.”

NUS CARE researchers assisting Willing Hearts charity to prepare and distribute food to recipients in Singapore

NUS CARE researchers assisting Willing Hearts charity to prepare and distribute food to recipients in Singapore

Brave.

Brave /brāv/ verb. Endure or face unpleasant conditions or behavior with courage. This week, we had our very first focus group with 10 women who are domestic helpers in Singapore, and we are also continuing to interview women who are currently working in their employers’ homes. “Brave” only scratches the surface in describing the stories we heard. Together, the CARE team and the focus group discovered that there are so many problems, injustices, and issues to tackle together and through all the tears in the focus group, mine included, I was confronted with how different our worlds are but how similar our hearts are. At the very core, regardless of socioeconomic status, occupation, or culture, people want to be treated like real people, with respect and dignity, and as we all know, it’s painful when it is not afforded to you.

 

Histories

Films can be a powerful medium to bring about social change, simply by showing us stories that would otherwise go unnoticed. This week, CARE rubbed shoulders with notable Singaporean filmmakers Boo Junfeng and Tan Pin Pin, who came down to NUS for screenings of their films and to chat with the audience. The common thread running through both of the films screened was one of individual histories which often differ from official accounts. More about the screenings and Q&A’s to come!