CNM Research Talk: See Yourself Sensing: Redefining Human Perception, The Sensory Apparatus And The Future Of Human- Presented By Professor Madeline Schwartzman

Abstract:

Did you know that we can see with our tongue? Will robotic hair become our next important digital tool? What ways will we use technology to remember plants after they have been destroyed? Madeline Schwartzman presents her research of artists and designers exploring the future of the human senses, the human head, and our technological relationship with nature. Her talk stems from her personal design, architecture, and artistic practices along with her research from her two books and current exhibition.

See Yourself Sensing: Redefining Human Perception (2011)– is the first book to survey the fascinating intersection between design, the body and the senses over the last fifty years, from the utopian pods, pneumatics and head gear of the 1960’s, to the high-tech prostheses, wearable computing, implants, and interfaces between computers and the human nervous system of the recent decade.

See Yourself X focuses in on our fundamental perceptual domain- the human head—presenting an array of conceptual and constructed ideas for extending ourselves physically into space. This includes all forms of physical head augmentation, including new organs, hair extensions and hairdos, masks, head constructions and gear, headdresses, prosthetics and helmets by artists, designers, inventors and scientists.

See Yourself E(x)ist looks at how artists envision our human future in nature- our poetic attempts at agency, our technological advances, and our futile role in the intricate and complex web of all living things.The art acknowledges the elegance of futility, the strangeness of attempts at permanence, and the absurdity of technological advances.

Speaker: 

Madeline Schwartzman is professor at Columbia, Barnard and Parsons. This writer, filmmaker and architect explores human narratives between art, design, technology and nature. Her books, See Yourself Sensing, See Yourself X and current exhibition See Yourself E(x)ist propose insights into a weird and wonderful future.

20 February 2018
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

NUS Central Library
CLB-04-04, Theatrette 1

Register at cnmn.us/exist.

CNM Research Talk: Making Sense of Public Culture- Presented By Professor Nikos Papastergiadis

Abstract:

In this lecture, Professor Nikos Papastergiadis explores the challenge of making sense of culture that occurs in public spaces. Unlike the performances and displays of culture within interior spaces, the experience of culture in an urban and networked public environment presents new challenges for cultural interpretation and evaluation. Relying on traditional art historical categories or emergent digital ethnographic tools may be either too narrow or too focused on technological affordances. Instead, he proposes to explore a new conceptual approach that seeks to grasp the wide range of artistic projects and diverse modes of public interaction. It will draw on research conducted at Melbourne’s Federation Square to discuss how the concept of ambience helps make sense of both the production and experience of public culture.

The first section of the article introduces the changing settings for culture: from an almost exclusively interior presentation to an increasingly mediated, networked and outdoor experience.

The second section situates this exteriorisation of culture in terms of a shifting urban environment that is increasingly interwoven with media networks, systems and infrastructure. This section also introduces the case study: Melbourne’s Federation Square.

The third section describes some of the different forms of engagement that take place in Federation Square and how this problematises traditional expectations of cultural experiences. Finally, he concludes with a reflection on these findings and draws out implications for cultural programming of public space.

Speaker: 

Nikos Papastergiadis Professor at the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne. He studied at the University of Melbourne and University of Cambridge. Prior to returning to the University of Melbourne he was a lecturer at the University of Manchester. T His sole authored publications include Modernity as Exile (1993), Dialogues in the Diaspora (1998), The Turbulence of Migration (2000), Metaphor and Tension (2004) Spatial Aesthetics: Art Place and the Everyday (2006), Cosmopolitanism and Culture (2012), Ambient Perspectives (2013) as well as being the editor of over 10 collections, author of numerous essays which have been translated into over a dozen languages and appeared in major catalogues such as the Biennales of Sydney, Liverpool, Istanbul, Gwanju, Taipei, Lyon, Thessaloniki and Documenta 13. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and co-chair of the Greek Centre for Contemporary Culture, and Chair of the International Advisory Board for the Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore.

7 February 2018
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
National University of Singapore
Blk AS6, #03-38, CNM Playroom

Register at cnmn.us/publicculture.

CNM Research Talk: Witnessing Suffering, Narrative Data, Autoethnographic Analysis, and Communicative Responsibility- Presented By Fulbright Scholar Professor Barbara Sharf

Abstract:

Medical humanities scholars have repeatedly made the case for the ethical importance of clinicians enacting attention, presence, and empathy to witness the stories of illness-related suffering disclosed by patients. However, the concept of witnessing has not received adequate attention in the communication literature (health communication or otherwise).

In this presentation, storied accounts of three instances of witnessing the tense precipice between living and dying experienced by patients being treated for critical illnesses in hospital intensive care units are described from the perspective of a non-clinician. Instead of these data being gathered through interviews or focus groups, they are instead drawn from [my own] personal participant-observation that includes a great deal of obvious subjectivity, interpersonal connection, and evoked emotions. So, is this data that counts as a form of research? Post-hoc reflection on these narrative accounts is unabashedly auto-ethnographic. Does authoethnographic analysis have validity and integrity as a scholarly venue? All of us are asked to consider what are the important aspects and responsibilities of being witness to another’s suffering.

Speaker: 

Barbara Sharf is a health communication researcher with research interests encompassing a wide variety of health-related topics. She is best-known for works employing qualitative forms of investigation and analysis, particularly narrative inquiry. She is the author or co-author of three books, the most recent being Storied Health and Illness: Communicating Personal, Cultural, and Political Complexities (2017), and more than 75 academic journal articles and book chapters. Currently Professor Emerita in the Department of Communication at Texas A & M, she remains active in conducting and publishing research. Her work has been honored as Outstanding Health Communication Scholar (2005) and Distinguished Health Communication Article (2017) by the National Communication Association. For the past decade, her work has focused on communicative aspects of integrative health care, specifically how culturally-based, complementary systems and modalities of healing have moved toward institutionalization within conventional, biomedical organizations. As a U.S. Fulbright Research Scholar, she has visited NUS for the last three years in the Department of Communication and New Media to extend her studies to Singapore.

2 February 2018
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

NUS Libraries, Central Library
National University of Singapore
CLB-04-04, Theatrette 1

Register at cnmn.us/witness.

CARE Research Talk: Critical Digital Health Studies, Now And In The Future- Presented By Professor Deborah Lupton

Abstract:

Digital technologies have risen to meet the challenge of delivering better healthcare, containing medical costs and getting people to engage more actively in the promotion of health, fitness, well-being as well as self-care for chronic conditions. In medical journals, public health literature, industry forums and ministries, discussion has been intense, but mired in an overly utopian and individualistic approach to digital health technologies. In this talk, Professor Deborah Lupton will outline what defines critical digital health studies, in which the socio-cultural, ethical and political implications are identified. She will then delve into her current research, and share some ideas to shape the future of digital health studies.

Speaker: 

Deborah Lupton is Centenary Research Professor in the News & Media Research Centre, Faculty of Arts & Design, University of Canberra. She is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, leader of the Smart Technology Living Lab at the University of Canberra, and the co-leader of the Digital Data & Society Consortium. Her latest books are Digital Sociology (Routledge, 2015), The Quantified Self (Polity, 2016) and Digital Health (Routledge, 2017), as well as the edited volumes Digitised Health, Medicine and Risk (Routledge, 2016), The Digital Academic (Routledge, 2017, co-edited with Inger Mewburn and Pat Thomson) and Self-Tracking, Health and Medicine (2017). Her current research interests all involve aspects of digital sociology: digital health, digital data cultures, self-tracking practices, digital food cultures, digitised academia, and the digital surveillance of children and young people.

19 January 2018
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
National University of Singapore

VENUE CHANGED!
Blk AS6, #03-38, CNM Playroom
Lecture Theatre 10 (Beside the Arts Canteen)

Register at cnmn.us/digitalhealth.

Communicative Challenges in Traditional Chinese Medicine

In the WHO Traditional Medicine Strategy 2014-2023 report, the World Health Organization discusses the burgeoning yet underestimated popularity of traditional medicine. Recognising that the dominance of western medicine has created unequal structures which reinforce the legitimacy of different healing systems, the report emphasises the importance of understanding the needs and uses of traditional medicines in healthcare systems.

CNM’s Professor Mohan Dutta, PhD candidate Pauline Luk, researchers Lily Lee and Desiree Soh tackle this urgency by establishing a groundbreaking study to examine how decisions made by patients and practitioners help promote Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as a viable means of healing. 25 TCM practitioners (the quintessential sinseh) and 51 TCM patients were interviewed between 2015 and 2016, where they described their practices of applying TCM, common meanings, daily habits of using TCM, concerns in communicating their choices in using TCM, the challenges they experience, and their day-to-day negotiations of these challenges.

The results are instructive. They reveal that both culture and structure can either complement or challenge the use of traditional medicine in Singapore’s multi-ethnic society. Patients, TCM practitioners, doctors trained in western medicine and the general public participate in the negotiation of TCM, constituted amid cultural constructions of TCM, and are guided by the overarching structure of healthcare in Singapore. Significantly, communication continues to play a critical role in shaping interpretations and understanding the key concepts and uses of TCM.

In a broader climate that privileges bio-medicine, the study demonstrates the advantage of underpinning policy decisions on TCM to conversations that are already taking place on the ground. This would help encourage collaboration between doctors trained in Western medicine and TCM practitioners, thus improving patient access to care in a distinctly local context of multiple healing traditions.

Do you use TCM in your life? Why not extend your thoughts here? If you need more information on this important research, reach out to us.

Research Talk – Social Marketing in India and Afghanistan: A Comparison

Dr. Sandeep Ghiya will be giving a research talk titled “Social Marketing in India and Afghanistan: A Comparison”, on 18 April 2017 (Tuesday). The talk will be held at the CNM Meeting Room, from 10 AM to 11 AM.

Abstract: The proposed talk will focus on experiences with Project Saksham in Uttar Pradesh, India and a consultancy with ASMO in Afghanistan.

Project Saksham was a four year project implemented by DKT India for the Futures Group led ITAP Project for USAID. The project aimed to promote oral contraceptive pills and condoms in rural villages, with a focus on C and D category villages with population between 1,000 and 4,999.

The Afghan Social Marketing Organization (ASMO) is a USAID supported Afghan managed organization operating across Afghanistan, promoting oral contraceptive pills, condoms, injectable contraceptives, oral rehydration salts, iron folic acid tablets and chlorine safe water solution.

The talk will provide brief overviews of the two projects, followed by a detailed discussion on the various means of interpersonal and mass communications that were employed to reach out to the target population in both projects. The similarities in approaches will be pointed out, along with a discussion on the differences. The challenges and drawbacks of both projects will be highlighted, along with a comparison of the geopolitical and other challenges faced in the two projects, inclusive of the difficulties in logistics and sales operations.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Sandeep Ghiya has been working on reproductive health issues with a focus on contraception for over 18 years. He has been especially interested in the marketing and usage of provider-dependent contraceptives and the promotion of all forms of contraception in rural areas. Dr. Ghiya has worked on the design, implementation and documentation of various projects to promote family planning at international, national and regional levels with projects focused on India, Afghanistan, Ghana, Kenya, Zambia and Burkina Faso. He has provided consultancy to projects for clients ranging from Family Planning Association of India, DFID, USAID, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Concept Foundation, Palladium and Abt Associates. With post graduate degrees in public health and marketing management, he has been an active participant in the marketing of contraception in India. Dr. Sandeep Ghiya has also been a visiting faculty member at management colleges for marketing and general management related subjects.


Venue: AS6, 03-33, CNM Meeting Room
Date:  18 April 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 10 AM – 11 AM