CNM Research Talk: See Yourself Sensing: Redefining Human Perception, The Sensory Apparatus And The Future Of Human- Presented By Professor Madeline Schwartzman

Abstract:

Did you know that we can see with our tongue? Will robotic hair become our next important digital tool? What ways will we use technology to remember plants after they have been destroyed? Madeline Schwartzman presents her research of artists and designers exploring the future of the human senses, the human head, and our technological relationship with nature. Her talk stems from her personal design, architecture, and artistic practices along with her research from her two books and current exhibition.

See Yourself Sensing: Redefining Human Perception (2011)– is the first book to survey the fascinating intersection between design, the body and the senses over the last fifty years, from the utopian pods, pneumatics and head gear of the 1960’s, to the high-tech prostheses, wearable computing, implants, and interfaces between computers and the human nervous system of the recent decade.

See Yourself X focuses in on our fundamental perceptual domain- the human head—presenting an array of conceptual and constructed ideas for extending ourselves physically into space. This includes all forms of physical head augmentation, including new organs, hair extensions and hairdos, masks, head constructions and gear, headdresses, prosthetics and helmets by artists, designers, inventors and scientists.

See Yourself E(x)ist looks at how artists envision our human future in nature- our poetic attempts at agency, our technological advances, and our futile role in the intricate and complex web of all living things.The art acknowledges the elegance of futility, the strangeness of attempts at permanence, and the absurdity of technological advances.

Speaker: 

Madeline Schwartzman is professor at Columbia, Barnard and Parsons. This writer, filmmaker and architect explores human narratives between art, design, technology and nature. Her books, See Yourself Sensing, See Yourself X and current exhibition See Yourself E(x)ist propose insights into a weird and wonderful future.

20 February 2018
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

NUS Central Library
CLB-04-04, Theatrette 1

Register at cnmn.us/exist.

CNM Research Talk: Making Sense of Public Culture- Presented By Professor Nikos Papastergiadis

Abstract:

In this lecture, Professor Nikos Papastergiadis explores the challenge of making sense of culture that occurs in public spaces. Unlike the performances and displays of culture within interior spaces, the experience of culture in an urban and networked public environment presents new challenges for cultural interpretation and evaluation. Relying on traditional art historical categories or emergent digital ethnographic tools may be either too narrow or too focused on technological affordances. Instead, he proposes to explore a new conceptual approach that seeks to grasp the wide range of artistic projects and diverse modes of public interaction. It will draw on research conducted at Melbourne’s Federation Square to discuss how the concept of ambience helps make sense of both the production and experience of public culture.

The first section of the article introduces the changing settings for culture: from an almost exclusively interior presentation to an increasingly mediated, networked and outdoor experience.

The second section situates this exteriorisation of culture in terms of a shifting urban environment that is increasingly interwoven with media networks, systems and infrastructure. This section also introduces the case study: Melbourne’s Federation Square.

The third section describes some of the different forms of engagement that take place in Federation Square and how this problematises traditional expectations of cultural experiences. Finally, he concludes with a reflection on these findings and draws out implications for cultural programming of public space.

Speaker: 

Nikos Papastergiadis Professor at the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne. He studied at the University of Melbourne and University of Cambridge. Prior to returning to the University of Melbourne he was a lecturer at the University of Manchester. T His sole authored publications include Modernity as Exile (1993), Dialogues in the Diaspora (1998), The Turbulence of Migration (2000), Metaphor and Tension (2004) Spatial Aesthetics: Art Place and the Everyday (2006), Cosmopolitanism and Culture (2012), Ambient Perspectives (2013) as well as being the editor of over 10 collections, author of numerous essays which have been translated into over a dozen languages and appeared in major catalogues such as the Biennales of Sydney, Liverpool, Istanbul, Gwanju, Taipei, Lyon, Thessaloniki and Documenta 13. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and co-chair of the Greek Centre for Contemporary Culture, and Chair of the International Advisory Board for the Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore.

7 February 2018
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
National University of Singapore
Blk AS6, #03-38, CNM Playroom

Register at cnmn.us/publicculture.

CNM Research Talk: Witnessing Suffering, Narrative Data, Autoethnographic Analysis, and Communicative Responsibility- Presented By Fulbright Scholar Professor Barbara Sharf

Abstract:

Medical humanities scholars have repeatedly made the case for the ethical importance of clinicians enacting attention, presence, and empathy to witness the stories of illness-related suffering disclosed by patients. However, the concept of witnessing has not received adequate attention in the communication literature (health communication or otherwise).

In this presentation, storied accounts of three instances of witnessing the tense precipice between living and dying experienced by patients being treated for critical illnesses in hospital intensive care units are described from the perspective of a non-clinician. Instead of these data being gathered through interviews or focus groups, they are instead drawn from [my own] personal participant-observation that includes a great deal of obvious subjectivity, interpersonal connection, and evoked emotions. So, is this data that counts as a form of research? Post-hoc reflection on these narrative accounts is unabashedly auto-ethnographic. Does authoethnographic analysis have validity and integrity as a scholarly venue? All of us are asked to consider what are the important aspects and responsibilities of being witness to another’s suffering.

Speaker: 

Barbara Sharf is a health communication researcher with research interests encompassing a wide variety of health-related topics. She is best-known for works employing qualitative forms of investigation and analysis, particularly narrative inquiry. She is the author or co-author of three books, the most recent being Storied Health and Illness: Communicating Personal, Cultural, and Political Complexities (2017), and more than 75 academic journal articles and book chapters. Currently Professor Emerita in the Department of Communication at Texas A & M, she remains active in conducting and publishing research. Her work has been honored as Outstanding Health Communication Scholar (2005) and Distinguished Health Communication Article (2017) by the National Communication Association. For the past decade, her work has focused on communicative aspects of integrative health care, specifically how culturally-based, complementary systems and modalities of healing have moved toward institutionalization within conventional, biomedical organizations. As a U.S. Fulbright Research Scholar, she has visited NUS for the last three years in the Department of Communication and New Media to extend her studies to Singapore.

2 February 2018
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

NUS Libraries, Central Library
National University of Singapore
CLB-04-04, Theatrette 1

Register at cnmn.us/witness.

CARE Research Talk: Critical Digital Health Studies, Now And In The Future- Presented By Professor Deborah Lupton

Abstract:

Digital technologies have risen to meet the challenge of delivering better healthcare, containing medical costs and getting people to engage more actively in the promotion of health, fitness, well-being as well as self-care for chronic conditions. In medical journals, public health literature, industry forums and ministries, discussion has been intense, but mired in an overly utopian and individualistic approach to digital health technologies. In this talk, Professor Deborah Lupton will outline what defines critical digital health studies, in which the socio-cultural, ethical and political implications are identified. She will then delve into her current research, and share some ideas to shape the future of digital health studies.

Speaker: 

Deborah Lupton is Centenary Research Professor in the News & Media Research Centre, Faculty of Arts & Design, University of Canberra. She is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, leader of the Smart Technology Living Lab at the University of Canberra, and the co-leader of the Digital Data & Society Consortium. Her latest books are Digital Sociology (Routledge, 2015), The Quantified Self (Polity, 2016) and Digital Health (Routledge, 2017), as well as the edited volumes Digitised Health, Medicine and Risk (Routledge, 2016), The Digital Academic (Routledge, 2017, co-edited with Inger Mewburn and Pat Thomson) and Self-Tracking, Health and Medicine (2017). Her current research interests all involve aspects of digital sociology: digital health, digital data cultures, self-tracking practices, digital food cultures, digitised academia, and the digital surveillance of children and young people.

19 January 2018
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
National University of Singapore

VENUE CHANGED!
Blk AS6, #03-38, CNM Playroom
Lecture Theatre 10 (Beside the Arts Canteen)

Register at cnmn.us/digitalhealth.

The New Paper: NUS Communications and New Media’s Groundbreaking Module on Fake News Featured

NUS’ Department of Communications and New Media’s groundbreaking module- NM2303 Fake News, Lies and Spin: How to Sift Fact From Fiction– is featured in the New Paper.

To fight fake news, tertiary institutions have introduced lessons to help students differentiate fact from fiction. Three polytechnics and three universities told The New Paper they recently introduced courses to tackle the growing problem, which has worsened globally. This move is timely as the Government steps up its own battle against fake news…

Source: The New Paper

CNM Research Talk: Reality Television As Global Form- Presented By Associate Professor Biswarup Sen

Abstract:

Reality television has become an important part of popular culture. In recent decades, reality shows like American Idol, Big Brother, Survivor and Donald Trump’s The Apprentice have attracted a worldwide audience, adding to more traditional forms of fictional storytelling associated with the novel, cinema and broadcast entertainment. Reality TV is a distinct kind of cultural phenomenon, one that is based on the uniqueness of the format, crossing borders in terms of production and distribution, and structurally constituted by the logic of neo-liberal subject formation. It serves as a global form that helps us understand the cultural impact of globalisation.

Speaker: 

Associate Professor Biswarup Sen has been teaching as an adjunct instructor at the School of Journalism and Communication since 2004.

He worked as a journalist in India before coming to the United States for graduate work in journalism and communication. He taught for several years in the Department of English, General Literature, and Rhetoric at the State University of New York, Binghamton, where he was a member of the University Diversity Task Force and served as an advisor to the student-run Harpur Academic Review. He has also worked as a consultant for a marketing firm and an internet-based company and as a communications specialist for nonprofit organizations.

17 January 2018
3:00 PM – 4:30 PM

Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
National University of Singapore
Blk AS6, #03-38
CNM Playroom

Register at cnmn.us/realitytv.

CNM Executive Education: The Nuts And Bolts of Science Communication

WHY YOU NEED TO ATTEND: Public engagement in science has emerged as the new frontier in policy circles, among scientists as well as professionals whose jobs are to effectively communicate science-related topics to non-experts . Although there have been a number of ongoing initiatives on this, there exists discrepancy in the understanding of concept, how it is operationalised, and how it is approached in the various communities of practice.

The 2-day course aims to provide its participants with in-depth understanding on the key debates and conceptual challenges in public engagement with science.

7 – 8 December 2017
9:00 am – 5:00 PM
@ Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
National University of Singapore
Block AS6, #03-38, CNM Meeting Room

Register Online Now at https://cnmn.us/sciencecomm

For enquiries, feel free to reach out to Mr Amir Hamid at amir@nus.edu.sg

Opinion: Social media and political polarisation in India- By Taberez Ahmed Neyazi

Assistant Professor Taberez Ahmed Neyazi observes that the high ideals of social media are slowly being eroded by toxic debates. He discusses the situation in India:

WHAT we traditionally understand as political polarization in the form of tough and negative rhetoric on the campaign trail that we assume is exacerbated by social media, is common during election campaigns by political parties. However, this polarization continues to thrive outside of election campaign periods among certain groups and is becoming much more evident in daily conversation on social media. The earlier promise that the internet and social media would offer space to marginalized groups and expand democratic deliberations seems to be giving way to more toxic debates. Similarly, research from the US and Europe suggests that the actors who were empowered in the mass media era remain the same in the digital media era, and hence, the same advantages and disadvantages that exist politically offline are being reproduced online.

 

Source: The Seminar

Team from NUS Communications and New Media Emerges as Champions for Pitch It 2017

The winners of Pitch It 2017 with the panel of judges from CNM, Visa Inc and BBDO Singapore.

By Deanne Galica

A team consisting of NUS Communications and New Media (CNM) students have emerged as the champion for Pitch It! 2017 after the grand finals held on November 10. Pitch It! 2017 is a tertiary-wide marketing competition organised by the CNM Society. This year, Pitch It! was organised in collaboration with Visa Inc and BBDO. The participating teams put together an integrated marketing campaign to address a challenge posed by Visa Inc.

After an elimination round, Visa Inc chose the top five teams who were then mentored by BBDO to refine their pitches. The challenge posed by VISA was – What can VISA do to shift brand perception from a credit card company to an innovative digital payment company amongst the Millennials?

In their campaign, the teams had to feature a wearable that showcases Visa Inc’s innovative digital payment capabilities.

The Winning Pitch

The winning pitch was a campaign titled #IAMVISA which aims to show how Visa can be a part of every millennial’s lifestyle. Their campaign was inspired by Calvin Klein’s 2016 Fall #mycalvins campaign. #IAMVISA features a playful take on VISA with each letter taking on a personality type –

V for Versatile
I for Intellectual
S for Simplistic
A for Adventurous

Phase One is a social media campaign featuring the different personality types to introduce #IAMVISA and act as a pretext for the next phase of the campaign.

Phase Two is a festival inspired by Art Box where attendees can pay using a temporary tattoo embedded with a VISA chip that flaunts VISA Inc’s digital payment innovation. The festival will be held across two weekends with each day featuring one personality type. Each personality type will be tied to a charity organisations and 10% of proceeds from the festival will be donated to these organisations.

Phase Three incorporates the different personality type into VISA cards with each card featuring a personality type.

The panel of judges consisting of personnel from CNM, VISA Inc and BBDO, unanimously chose the winning pitch. The judges were impressed with the cohesiveness of the winning team’s multi-pronged approach, backed by insightful research.

The Champions

The winning team consists of Cory Cheang Yi Jun, Pang Hui Ping, Taylor Chia Shi-Yen, Isabelle Anastasia Tan Yinn Lyn and Alvarez Brielle Clavel. All of whom are in their second year.

“The greatest difficulty we faced was juggling between school work and the competition,” said Cheang.

The winners walked away with an iPad Mini 4 each.

The Organisers

Behind the success of Pitch It! 2017 is the CNM Society. Led by Jasmine Chong and Deanne Galicia, Pitch It! was the biggest project for the society. The organisers faced setbacks initially with difficulty in securing partnerships with organisations. The partnership with Visa Inc was eventually secured with the help of an alumni.

“The competition was a year in the making. It was a huge undertaking! We reached out to many organisations and faced a lot of rejection. The real work hit us when we finally secured a partner client. From doing school visits to other tertiary institutions to managing communications with all parties involved. We spent countless hours planning everything to the last detail. In the end, it was all worth it because we truly believe Pitch It! is an incredible learning experience. Even [the planning committee] learnt a lot!” said Chong.

Pitch It! 2018 is under way and the planning has already begun. For the next edition, the CNM Society is looking to tap into the Institute of Public Relations Singapore and CNM’s Industry Advisory Council to find a partner client.

More about Pitch It! 2017

Pitch It! 2017 is the third edition of the competition. Past clients include Singapore Press Holdings and Mediacorp. This year, students from National University of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Management University, Singapore University of Social Sciences, Temasek Polytechnic, Singapore Polytechnic, Nanyang Polytechnic and General Assembly participated in the competition. There were 23 teams and a total of 107 participants.

Catch more of Pitch It! 2017 at the official gallery.

Want To Work With CNM?

Excited about what we’re doing at CNM? If you are a company, and want to work with our students, reach out to us by leaving a comment below.

Lu Weiquan Empowers Teaching Through Augmented Reality Tool

Assistant Professor Lu Weiquan describing CNM’s modules to a potential student at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences’ Open House

Although games popularised the use of Augmented Reality (AR) in our daily lives, its real power lies in its potential to transform education. Which is why Assistant Professor Lu Weiquan’s innovative tool ConjAR- a mobile AR scene-authoring tool for designing AR scenes within an AR environment- received so much attention at the recent National Conference on Technology-Enhanced Learning (TEL).

A Straits Times article extols ConjAR as a mobile application that:

…runs as a mobile application, and allows users to design and showcase 3D augmented reality scenes without prior training. For example, if a professor wants to explain the brain to his class, he can download a 3D image of a brain from the Internet, and create a model that can be turned and shifted while he is conducting his lesson.

Source: The Straits Times

Another demonstration of how NUS’ Department of Communications and New Media’s teaching and research continues to break new ground in bridging the diverse threads of emerging fields and future work.