Search Results for: raka shome

Distinguished Scholar Award for Dr Raka Shome

Each year the Critical and Cultural Studies Division of the National Communication Association presents awards for outstanding scholarship, teaching, and professional service in the field of communication. This year, Dr Raka Shome will be awarded the Distinguished Scholar Award for her work in Cultural Studies in Communication.  The award recognises scholarly achievements in the study of human communication and will be given to Dr Shome during this year’s NCA Annual Convention which will be held in Philadelphia from 10-13 Nov, 2016.

” I am delighted about this award not just because ‘I’ received it but more important because it honors the kinds of difficult and challenging work that many scholars working on decolonization of academic knowledge are engaged in”, says Dr Shome.

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Dr Shome at a lecture in Germany. Photo credit: Universität Erfurt

Dr Shome’s research interests are in Asian Modernities, Transnational relations of India, Racism and Media in a global context, Transnational Media Cultures and Gender, and the Transnational politics of knowledge production as a communication issue. She has published numerous articles and book chapters in leading journals the field of Media and Communication Studies and is the author of Diana and Beyond: White Femininity, National Identity, and Contemporary Media Culture – a book that examines how new sets of postcolonial relations in contemporary western cultures are mediated through images of white femininity.

Congratulations, Dr Shome!

 

Prof Raka Shome’s research awarded grant by Waterhouse Family Institute for the Study of Communication and Society

Raka Shome ProfileProf Raka Shome has been awarded a $10,000 grant by the Waterhouse Family Institute for the Study of Communication and Society, Villanova University, Pennsylvania. The grant is awarded for Prof Shome’s research titled ‘Spectacular Nationalism and Contemporary India’.

Each year, the Waterhouse Family Institute funds research conducted by scholars across the world, based on the emphasis the research gives to communication and those that engage communication and its impact on the world and ability to create social change. The WFI Research Grants are selectively awarded and Prof Shome’s reserach has been awarded the maximum grant amount to support her research.

Prof Shome’s research  attempts to understand the ways in which a spectacular nationalism is being produced in contemporary India and the ways in which it functions to produce a new national pride that is articulated in relation to the global while reifiying hardened logics of nagtionalism.  Through a focus on  many media campaigns as well as the circulation of commodities that are being rebranded through revivalist “Indian” logic, Prof Shome attempts to offer an extended theory of spectacular nationalism (as opposed to nationalism as just spectacle)– especially in the context of current India. She also attempts to trace the linkage between this spectacular nationalism and the overt and invisible discourses of Hindutva that are being normalized by the spectacular logic of contemporary Indian nationalism.

Congratulations, Prof Shome!

 

 

Workshop by Prof Raka Shome – Postcolonial Approaches to Communication & Social Justice

We have another workshop coming up from the 19th to 21st of October! Dr Raka Shome, who recently joined the CNM Department as a Visiting Senior Fellow, will be conducting the 3-day workshop to share her views on Postcolonial Studies. Please refer to the poster below for more information about the workshop. If you are interested to join us, please indicate your attendance by signing up for this workshop here!

*Do take note that the readings for this workshop could be retrieved from the Library.

 

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Here is a little bit about Dr Raka Shome:

Dr. Raka Shome writes on postcolonial cultures, transnational feminism, and media/communication cultures.  Her current research interests are in Asian Modernities, Transnational relations of India, Racism and Media in a global context, Transnational Media Cultures and Gender, and the Transnational politics of knowledge production as a communication issue. Dr. Shome has published numerous articles and book chapters in leading journals and anthologies in the field of Media and Communication Studies .  She is the author of Diana and Beyond: White Femininity, National Identity, and Contemporary Media Culture (University of Illinois Press, 2014)—a book that examines how new sets of postcolonial relations in contemporary western cultures are mediated through images of white femininity. Under her co-guest editorship, the first-ever special issue on “Postcolonialism” was published in the field of Communication Studies in the International Communication Association journal Communication Theory (August, 2002).  She recently also guest edited a special issue on “Asian Modernities” (2012) in the (Sage) journal Global Media and Communication, which included several articles focused on the question of what it means to be “modern” outside of liberal western frameworks.  She is finishing up another special issue as guest editor for Cultural Studies/Critical Methodologies  journal on ‘Gender, Nation, Colonialism: Twenty first century connections.

Written & designed by Abdul Rahman, CARE

In Conversation with Dr Raka Shome

Raka Shome - Flyer CroppedThis academic year, CNM is delighted to host Dr Raka Shome who joins us as a Visiting Senior Fellow. Dr. Shome writes on postcolonial cultures, transnational feminism, and media/communication cultures.  Her current research interests are in Asian Modernities, Transnational relations of India, Racism and Media in a global context, Transnational Media Cultures and Gender, and the Transnational politics of knowledge production as a communication issue. Dr. Shome has published numerous articles and book chapters in leading journals and anthologies in the field of Media and Communication Studies.  She is the author of Diana and Beyond: White Femininity, National Identity, and Contemporary Media Culture (University of Illinois Press, 2014)—a book that examines how new sets of postcolonial relations in contemporary western cultures are mediated through images of white femininity. Under her co-guest editorship, the first-ever special issue on “Postcolonialism” was published in the field of Communication Studies in the International Communication Association journal Communication Theory (August, 2002).  She recently also guest edited a special issue on “Asian Modernities” (2012) in the (Sage) journal Global Media and Communication, which included several articles focused on the question of what it means to be “modern” outside of liberal western frameworks.  She is finishing up another special issue as guest editor for Cultural Studies/Critical Methodologies journal on ‘Gender, Nation, Colonialism: Twenty first century connections.’  She will be giving a talk on Wednesday, 28 October at 3PM in the CNM Meeting Room.

Tell us a little about yourself – where you come from, what your research interests are and what brought you to NUS?

I am visiting from the United States.  My current research interests are in the related areas of  Media and Asian Modernities, transnational politics of knowledge production,  Transnational feminism,  Gender, Culture, and Migration,  Transnational flows of mediated cultures (especially towards and within the Global South);  New logics of postcoloniality; Cultural Studies (beyond the Birmingham framework).  I was attracted to NUS because of the vibrant and exciting work being done on media, and cultural studies, within an Asian framework.  And it is also a top university in the world –so I felt this exposure to a vibrant academic space in Asia would add a lot to my own current interests; so when I was offered this opportunity, I was delighted.  Teaching students in Asia is exciting because one (if you are coming from the Western academy) necessarily has to rethink many of one’s frames for engaging culture and media —if you want to be transnationally responsive and responsible.  In the past, I have held faculty appointments at London School of Economics and Political Science, Arizona State University, University of Washington and was an Endowed Visiting Chair at Villanova University.     

What modules do you teach?

An undergraduate module–Philosophy of Communication and New Media– and was also scheduled to teach a graduate course on Technological Embodiments 

What got you started on your research path and field of research?

My work broadly falls within Postcolonial Studies.  My own experiences of cultural (and national) marginalization –when I arrived first as a student in the US, and then beyond that—led to my often finding solace– and more important explanations– in postcolonial studies.   

What is your approach to research? 

Interdisciplinary.  The questions that usually inform my research traverse disciplinary boundaries, as they are broadly related to social justice.  I work through an approach that is called ‘Cultural Studies.’ 

An aspiring researcher should….

Have passion for your work.  The work should matter, think of your intellectual work not as a “job” but as a space through which you can perhaps make some changes–in people’s minds–towards a more humane world.  A tall order to be sure, but hold on to that. 

What are some issues/causes (could be outside your academic/professional interests) that you care deeply about?

I care about the fact–deeply–that today people are increasingly less educated–not just formal education, but less able to think critically about issues largely because we are constantly fed by so much information that there is rarely any access to deep knowledge; today there is an attitude that ‘ignorance is my birth right” and any opinion counts.  I worry about how due to corporate media power, and what are offered to people in the name of ‘information’ results in a rapid decline in democracy in most places in the world today.   

Tell us a little bit about your book ‘Diana and beyond….’

The book examines media images of celebrity white women, and focuses on how social scripts of white womanhood produces larger ideological structures of white femininity, that in Anglo dominant nations, that often function in the service of nationalism.  The book examines a host of media images of celebrity white women–Diana of course, but others such as Angelina Jolie, Cherie Blair, Sandra Bullock, Victoria Beckham, and many others.  

What are your thoughts on transnational relations and social media?

Social media such as Facebook, twitter, and so on, on the one hand enable certain transnational connections and hence transnational community formations.  Yet, on the other hand, as these become regular everyday spaces of communication, we need to remember who does not have access to these spaces.  We also need to recognize how social media –as data and information–is constantly used by data mining companies to categorize people and behaviours and needs.  This can have serious implications not just for privacy but also for the ways in which the populations of the world can be categorized, codified and so on, through the “information” that social media makes available to the owners of the sites.   

The modern Asian woman and feminism – almost there or a long way to go?

Every feminist movement–anywhere–has a long way to go.  We need to stay away from the (western created) idea that somehow Asian women have a long way to go.  The progress of women in Asia needs to be addressed in the CONTEXT of their societies.  WE do not want to use western notions of progress and advancement to evaluate gender in Asian contexts.    

When you are not researching or teaching you like to….

Watch movies–am a movie buff; love watching plays, and trying different cuisines, and traveling.  

How has the Singapore experience been so far? Sights, food, history, post-colonial Singapore, culture, arts…?

Am loving it. It is a fascinating place.  It is beautiful, and vibrant. I love the multiculturalism here.  It is a very different, and in many ways, a more ‘progressive’ (if one can use the term) kind of multiculturalism than what you see in many western countries.  Singapore also seems to be a wonderful meeting place for Asian and western cultural practices.   

To know more about Dr Shome, her research and her publications visit http://profile.nus.edu.sg/fass/cnmsr/

MOBILITIES, COMMUNICATION AND ASIA: POSTCOLONIAL FRAMEWORKS

Edited by Mohan J. Dutta & Raka Shome, National University of Singapore

International Journal of Communication

We are inviting high quality papers on mobilities and communication from interdisciplinary scholars working in the Asian context.

The global movement of capital, commodities, and labor is constituted amid political and economic structures that render salient certain meanings of mobility while at the same time erasing other possibilities for interpreting mobility. Further, the global movement of capital, while enabling and encouraging mobility for some, also render many others immobile, disconnected/erased from the possibilities of movement. To that extent, mobility and immobility are not binaries but are interrelated—an interrelation that expresses and captures the numerous desires and violences of globalization. The figure of the migrant and the various processes of migration make these relations visible while rendering invisible other imaginations of migrancy. Linked to this are mediated and communication practices—such as technology, films, music, social media, remittances, cultural commodities, and more—that play an intrinsic role in shaping and informing various types of migratory movements or lack therefor. Additionally, the transnational migration of communication practices themselves constitute new forms of mobilities and immobilities, agency and identity formations, imaginations and desires.

Communication is central to these above-mentioned processes. For example, technology firms are constantly developing new communication language through software that requires a constant flow of transnational expert workers who are often treated in problematic ways (in terms of cultural recognition and wages) in “host” nations. Similarly, finance capital globally circulates through communicative values and processes (including migrant remittances to their nation of “origin’—a process itself underwritten by non-western values of domesticity and familiality). Transnational movements of celebrities and popular culture (for instance, in Asia) serve diasporic populations in many parts of Asia that have implications for their migrant experience as well as the production of a transnational Asian identity. Disempowered and often stateless migrants (for instance migrant Bangladeshi workers in Asia) connect to or engage their music in their diasporic situations —to produce some sense of cultural security in an otherwise coercive exploitative condition (lacking decent food, shelter, wages and more).

Relations of gender, sexuality, religion, class and nationality are central considerations in these phenomena since migration itself is often wrought with gender and religious violences, discrimination and exploration of poor laborers, and the devaluing of peoples of particular nations in global migratory practices (for instance, White Europeans or Americans are usually seen as “expatriates” while the word migration is reserved for mobilities of non-western peoples even within non-western ‘host’ nations).

Communication Studies as a formal field has hardly paid attention these issues—issues that require urgent exploration from a communication perspective. Such an exploration will further move the field of Communication Studies into considerations of the many dilemmas and challenges of the 21st century that are grounded in the politics of migration.

This edited Special Section seeks to comprehend such phenomena, with specific attention to Asia. It will examine the interplay of communication (broadly considered)—particularly mediated practices—and im/mobilities, attending to how the intersection between the two illustrate the movement of people, labor, representations, commodities, technology and more, across global circuits of culture, economy, and geopolitics.

Submissions will be limited to 6000 words, all-inclusive.

We first solicit detailed abstracts of approximate 500-600 words.

Due: April 31, 2017. Please send abstract to Mohan Dutta at cnmmohan@nus.edu.sg

Authors of selected abstracts will be notified by May 31, 2017.

Final papers due: July 31, 2017. Please submit to Mohan Dutta at cnmmohan@nus.edu.sg

Please follow the author guidelines at http://ijoc.org/index.php/ijoc/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

 

CNM Academic Staff Recruitment – Job Talk

Dr Raka Shome will be giving a talk on 31 March 2017, Friday, at the CNM Meeting Room. Her talk is titled “Spectacular Nationalism and Contemporary India” and will commence at 3 PM. More details about the job talk can be found in the picture below:

 

Prof. Mohan Dutta to present at the National Communication Association’s Annual Convention

© NUS CNM | Photography by Lionel LinProf Mohan Dutta, Head of Department, CNM and Director of CARE, will be speaking at the opening session of the National Communication Association’s (NCA) 102nd Annual Convention on Thursday, 11 Nov 2016. The convention will be held from 10-13 Nov 2016 at Philadelphia. Prof Dutta, along with two other communication scholars Dr. Bryant Keith Alexander of Loyola Marymount University and Dr. Billie Murray of Villanova University will lead “Putting Bodies on the Line and Words into Action: Celebrating the Joys of, Challenges in, and Opportunities for Civic Engagement,” a discussion about using communication to address issues related to race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality at the opening session.

According to NCA’s press release more than 5000 communication researchers, teachers and students are expected at this year’s convention titled “Communication’s Civic Callings”. The convention will provide a platform to discuss domestic and international issues such as social activism, feminism and gender identity, race and religion, technology, media and entertainment, and so on.

The convention will also honour communication scholars for their research through specific awards. CNM’s Visiting Senior Fellow Dr Raka Shome will be awarded the Distinguished Scholar Award during this convention.

 

Research Talk – Critical Reflections on ‘Dewesternizing’ communication and media studies; And the limits of a ‘comparative’ framework

This talk will respond to contemporary trends in media studies that argue for “dewesternizing” media studies as a move towards “globalizaing” media studies.  While applauding such  well intentioned arguments about ‘dewesternizing” media studies, this talk will suggest that  simply engaging in ‘dewesternizing’–that is simply looking at the Non West–does not necessarily result in a politics and project of decolonizing media/communication studies that it badly needs.   If media/communication studies is to be transnationally responsive and responsible, and be informed by a transnational ethical sensibility (which is different from “international”)   it needs to move towards a project of decolonization–decolonization of our theories, epistemes, sensibilities as well as our academic spaces.  An additive and benign move of ‘dewesternizing” that simply includes, instead of disrupting, non western frameworks into our mainstream canon does not always unsettle the eurocentric (and often colonial) ethos of western media studies’ canon.   Issues of transnational (and colonial)  power relations, and the  geopolitical  imbalance within which academic knowledge is produced,  must be addressed as well.  Ultimately, if our discipline is to be committed to a politics of social justice, what is needed then is  decolonization, not simply dewesternization, of our theories, imaginations, and spaces.  In this context, this talk will also discuss the limits of the notion of “comparativism” or “comparative” that also seems to be in vogue today.

About the Speaker

Raka Shome ProfileDr. Raka Shome writes on on postcolonial cultures, transnational feminism, and media/communication cultures.  Her current research interests are in Asian Modernities, Transnational relations of India, Racism and Media in a global context, Transnational Media Cultures and Gender, and the Transnational politics of knowledge production as a communication issue. Dr. Shome has published numerous articles and book chapters in leading journals and anthologies in the field of Media and Communication Studies .  She is the author of Diana and Beyond: White Femininity, National Identity, and Contemporary Media Culture (University of Illinois Press, 2014)—a book that examines how new sets of postcolonial relations in contemporary western cultures are mediated through images of white femininity.  The book has garnered international attention and has been reviewed by Australian Broadcasting Corporation (interviewed in their radio show), Times Literary Supplement, Times Higher Education Supplement, Journal of Communication, European Journal of Communication, New Formations, Fashion Style and Popular Culture, Soundings, Quarterly Journal of Speech among others.

Under her co-guest editorship, the first-ever special issue on “Postcolonialism” was published in the field of Communication Studies in the International Communication Association journal Communication Theory (August, 2002).  She recently also guest edited a special issue on “Asian Modernities” (2012) in the (Sage) journal Global Media and Communication, which included several articles focused on the question of what it means to be “modern” outside of liberal western frameworks.  She recently guest edited a special issue as guest editor for Cultural Studies/Critical Methodologies  journal on ‘Gender, Nation, Colonialism: Twenty first century connections.’  She has held full time faculty appointments at London School of Economics, Arizona State University and University of Washington.  In fall 2014, she was invited by the Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden (that typically hosts leading international cultural studies scholars)  to serve as a visiting scholar. She is currently beginning a new project entitled “Spectacular Nationalism and Contemporary India”

Dr. Shome has delivered several  talks (including keynotes and plenaries) and workshops, nationally and internationally, on issues of postcoloniality, gender, transnational feminism, and racism in contemporary global contexts.  In November 2016, she will be a keynote speaker at University of Melbourne at the  Mobility, Gender and Social Transformations in Asia Conference. Some of her other recent keynote and plenary talks have been at London School of Economics and Political Science, University of Amsterdam, Utrecht University, Soderton University, Goethenberg University, Rhetoric Society of America (Madison, WI), German Communication Association.

She has been a past chair of the Cultural Studies Division of National Communication Association (NCA).  She has received research awards  from National Communication Association such as ‘Outstanding Article Award’ (twice) from Critical/Cultural Studies Division, the New Investigator Award from Rhetoric and communication Theory Division, Distinguished Scholar (co-awardee) from International and Intercultural Division,  As a graduate student she was the recipient of the Bostrom  Research Award from Southern States Communication (given to promising graduate students for research) and Peterson Award (for top paper), also from Southern States Communication Association.  She is listed in Who’s Who of America (Marquis, 2004)

Date: 16 August 2016

Time: 3pm – 4pm

Venue: CNM Meeting Room

CARE Conference – “Communication for Social Change: Intersections of Theory and Praxis”

The Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE)’s housed under the Department of Communications and New Media is holding a conference titled “Communication for Social Change: Intersections of Theory and Praxis”, from 6-8 January 2016. 

This conference brings together communication scholars, both experienced and new, to share, dialogue, debate, and discourse on the future of social change in the discipline. Rooted in the idea that theory is deeply intertwined with praxis in the field, our conference is also envisioned as a platform to build solidarity among people working within the academic-activist spectrum. Featuring a mix of informative plenary sessions and paper presentations by faculty and graduate students from all around the world, the conference will be most beneficial for faculty and students that are interested in social change, activism, health communication, and postcolonial studies, from a communicative angle.

Professor Collins O. Airhihenbuwa is the opening keynote speaker and will deliver his talk titled “Leadership for Social Justice in Global Health Communication: Why Culture Matters”on 7 January 2016, 8.30 – 9.30 am. The conference will also include panel sessions chaired by other  scholars such as Professor Mohan J. Dutta, Professor Ambar Basu, Professor Raka Shome, and Professor Barbara Sharf.

The last day for registration is 24 December 2015. To register for the conference click here. A registration fee of S$75 is payable in cash during the official registration on 6 January 2016, at NUS. To register for the keynote click here

For more details email Ms Naomi Tan at naomitan@nus.edu.sg